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    Category: Decks


    deck – Wiktionary - March 25, 2019 by admin

    English[edit]Pronunciation[edit]Etymology 1[edit]

    From Middle English dekke, borrowed from Middle Dutch dec (roof, covering), from Middle Dutch dekken, from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-Germanic *akjan. Cognate with German Decke (covering, blanket). Also related with English thatch, thack.

    deck (plural decks)

    to swab the deck

    Terms derived from deck (noun)

    any flat surface walked on

    floorlike covering on a ship

    Translations to be checked

    deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

    to furnish with a deck, as a vessel

    (slang) to knock someone to the floor with a single punch

    From Middle English dekken, from Middle Dutch dekken (to cover), from Old Dutch theckon, *thecken, from Proto-Germanic *akjan (to roof; cover). More at thatch.

    deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

    deck

    Borrowed from English deck.

    deckm (invariable)

    deck

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    deck - Wiktionary

    Seto Kaiba’s Decks | Yu-Gi-Oh! | FANDOM powered by Wikia - January 30, 2019 by admin

    Kaiba mainly runs Decks that centralize on a beatdown strategy to aggressively overwhelm his opponents with high ATK monsters. During the first several arcs of the Yu-Gi-Oh anime, his Deck is composed of vicious-looking monsters, with most of them being DARK Fiend-Type. The Spells and Traps in his Deck normally serve to disrupt and counter any strategies his opponents would use. His monster lineup is spearheaded by his signature card, "Blue-Eyes White Dragon" and its Fusion form, "Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon". In the later arcs, he incorporates "Virus" Trap Cards such as "Giant Germ", "Crush Card", and "Virus Cannon" that give it the traits of a Virus Control Deck and swarm Deck, destroying all monsters in his opponent's Deck with more than 1500 ATK, further crippling their ability to defend against him.

    As the series evolves, Kaiba's switches his focus towards Dragon-Type monsters. His later Decks incorporate an array of Dragon and Dragon-Type support cards such as "Spear Dragon", "Luster Dragon #2", Different Dimension Dragon", "Paladin of White Dragon", and "Chaos Emperor Dragon - Envoy of the End" while still maintaining "Blue Eyes White Dragon" and "Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon" as his most aggressive boss monsters. His later Decks still retain much of the aggressive beatdown strategies to wreak havoc upon his opponents with high ATK incorporated with Dragon-type support cards that contain inherent self-protection effects.

    This Deck is seen in a flashback during the Virtual World arc. These cards were taken away by Seto and Mokuba's stepfather, and were taken back by Mokuba Kaiba.

    During Duelist Kingdom, his Deck utilized various brutal appearing monsters to reflect his personality. Ghost Kaiba also utilized Kaiba's Deck and the Duel Computer also used some of his cards when Kaiba wanted to test his new Duel Disk system. Notably, his signature card (through all seasons of the anime and manga) is the "Blue-Eyes White Dragon". His main plan consists of using "Saggi the Dark Clown" as bait, then use "Crush Card" to destroy the opponent's Deck. Against Yugi he tries regaining Life Points or destroying the opponents cards to stall until he draws the right cards required for Summoning "Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon" for the final blow.

    After obtaining "Obelisk the Tormentor" and developing the Duel Disk, Kaiba creates a Deck to test them both out and Duels against a Duel Computer, which used some of Kaiba's own cards.

    In Battle City, Kaiba's Deck takes on several traits of a Virus Deck, which focuses on removing cards from his opponents' Decks and leaving them with limited options. One of the main strategies in this Deck includes using "Crush Card Virus" and "Virus Cannon" to mill his opponents' Decks, while also attempting to Summon "Obelisk the Tormentor" for the finishing blow. His "Obelisk the Tormentor" is supported with "Soul Exchange", and if that fails, he implemented parts of a Machine deck representing Kaiba's expertise in technology; mainly he uses his "XYZ" monsters as offense until he is able to Summon "Obelisk".

    The Virtual World Deck is very similar to Kaiba's Battle City Deck, though with more emphasis on Dragon-Type monsters, and without his Egyptian God (as the Virtual World's Deck construction list excludes the God Cards).

    During the Waking the Dragons arc, Kaiba uses a Virus/Critias Deck. Kaiba's Deck evolves considerably, as he begins to include many more Dragons in his Deck, while also gaining "Fang of Critias", and still supporting "Blue-Eyes White Dragon" and "XYZ" monsters. He supports many of his Trap Cards with "Fang of Critias", creating powerful monsters to defeat the opponent.

    Kaiba only Dueled once in the Grand Championship arc (in order to officially disqualify Zigfried von Schroeder). This Deck, which still consisted mostly of Dragons, focused on swarming the field with monsters that were removed from play, using "Dimension Fusion".

    Kaiba duels once in this arc as well, against Yami Bakura, but the Duel is not finished because his opponent leaves in the middle of it. Against Bakura, he included cards from previous arcs, focusing mainly on his "Blue-Eyes White Dragon". Kaiba uses cards from previous arcs while he's in ancient Egypt to protect himself and others from harm.

    On more than one occasion, Kaiba has opened his briefcase to reveal a large collection of rare cards.

    First Briefcase

    Upon hearing that Solomon Muto has a Blue-Eyes White Dragon, Kaiba brings a briefcase full of rare cards in an attempt to trade him for it.

    Second Briefcase

    Kaiba's second briefcase contained his prototype for the Duel Disk as well as many other valuable cards he took to Duelist Kingdom with him.

    Third Briefcase

    Kaiba's third briefcase of cards was offered to improve Koji Nagumo's deck prior to him dueling with Obelisk the Tormentor. Kaiba's condition was that he could keep the rare cards he added if he beat him in a duel.

    Fourth Briefcase

    Kaiba's fourth briefcase consists of some of his best and most powerful cards offered to Yugi for his duel against the Pharaoh.

    Seto's early Deck includes these cards as well two unnamed monsters.

    Seto's Duelist Kingdom manga Deck includes these cards, as well as one unnamed monster.

    This Deck was made by Seto in order to test the power of The God of the Obelisk against his three "Blue-Eyes".

    Seto's Battle City Deck is very similar to his anime Deck, and it also contains one Level 8 unnamed monster. Dark Marik described his Deck during his Duel with Yugi as a Power Deck designed to suppress the opponent with monsters while gathering sacrifices to Summon his God card. Kaiba is not limited to using his own monsters, however, making liberal use of "Soul Exchange" to use his opponent's monsters as the sacrifices he needed. At the same time, he did not abandon his "Blue-Eyes White Dragons," often using them as either backup or a temporary replacement for "Obelisk," and including multiple methods to Summon them with the utilization of the ordinary twin-Tribute method. He also retained his Virus strategies, which he used against Ishizu, but he likely temporarily abandoned them in the manga after learning that his "Crush Card" strategy would be ineffective against "Ra."

    Kaiba runs a Crack-and-Power Deck. Having lost his God card, Kaiba has expanded upon his previous strategies; he includes new support for Virus Cards and also more "self-fusing" Fusion Monsters, notably the "Material" series. His "Blue-Eyes White Dragons" are back to their old position of spearheading his Deck.

    Kaiba was only shown Dueling during Gerard's flashback. He defeated him with "Blue-Eyes White Dragon".

    A Monster Spirit named Kaibamanwho was rumored to have been created in honor of Kaiba, has been shown to possess a Deck based on Kaiba's Blue-Eyes White Dragon Deck. All the listed cards were part of Kaibaman's Deck.

    In the movie, Kaiba's Deck works by removing monsters like the "XYZ" monsters from play to Special Summon them back to the field. After obtaining "Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon", he modifies his Deck slightly to include it and "Pyramid of Light"

    Only the cards used by Kaiba in his Duels were shown in the film. The full Deck List was given in the novelization of the film.

    In the film, Kaiba plays a "Blue-Eyes Deck", featuring expanded support for "Blue Eyes White Dragon" and other high Level Dragon-Type monsters.

    During this duel, Kaiba claims to have specially pre-delivered Saga of Blue-Eyes White Dragon Structure Deck.

    Kaiba's signature card is shown to be Blue-Eyes White Dragon.

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    Seto Kaiba's Decks | Yu-Gi-Oh! | FANDOM powered by Wikia

    Browse Thousands of Inspiring Decks on Houzz - September 25, 2018 by admin

    171,487 Deck IdeasView All Photos

    Rooftop Deck Installation

    Q

    Deck Lighting Installation

    Q

    Mike SchwartzExample of a trendy backyard deck design in Chicagoit shows how the ideas you can do in the backyard brilliant - laishung_choy

    Sunset views of the Space Needle from the roof deck.Photography by TC Peterson.Small elegant rooftop deck photo in Seattlelove the lighting glowing around the edges - sue_robert81

    Deck - traditional deck idea in New York

    Photo: Jessica Cain 2018 HouzzMid-sized eclectic backyard deck photo in Kansas CityColours especially the white kitchen with blue countertop and back splash. - jane_stephenson14

    Klassen PhotographyInspiration for a mid-sized rustic side yard deck remodel in Jackson with a roof extension - stefka_beikova

    Jimmy White PhotographyOutdoor kitchen deck - large transitional backyard outdoor kitchen deck idea in Seattle with a roof extensionoutdoor lights/plugs/lighting ideas... would like can lights in ceiling for outside roof at minimum. Couple High plug outlets. - mbschlabach

    Popular Filters to Try:

    Outdoor entertaining space bedecked with Restoration Hardware furniture, antique Indian quilts and other accents from Maze Home Store. Photo credit: Chris DavisBlankets at the Ready in IllinoisAdding warmth to your outdoor seating area can be as easy as bringing out blankets from the house.For this house in Evanston, near Chicago, patterned quilts draped over the backs of outdoor dining chairs bring a hit of color and warmth, tempting guests to linger past sunset. - cletaintx

    The Club Woven by Summer Classics is the resin version of the aluminum Club Collection. Executed in durable woven wrought aluminum it is ideal for any outdoor space. Club Woven is hand woven in exclusive N-dura resin polyethylene in Oyster. French Linen, or Mahogany. The comfort of Club with the classic look and durability of resin will be perfect for any outdoor space. - ____________249894

    Mountain style deck photo in Other with a fire pit and a roof extensionI will have this back porch balcony. That fireplace, that guardrail, that wood floor and of course that rich forest in the back ground. - webuser_741650341

    Example of a mountain style deck design in Other with a fire pitLOVE everything about this .. the railing, the ceiling, the furniture, the fireplace and tv ...the flooring ... everything!!! - cindy_jones5362821

    Deck - traditional deck idea in New York

    This space is perfect for entertaining! When the owners originally moved in, this deck was not here. There were several steps down from the kitchen door, and the stone slabs were a toe-stubbing minefield. We added the deck and designed it perfectly for entertaining. Since we had several large pine trees removed from the property, we increased sun exposure creating a need for more shade. We had this awning custom made by PJ Canvas in Santa Rosa, CA. The awning tucks neatly under the roof of the house during the rainy months. definitely want this for the back patio area! This is a great solution to the problem of not having shade. :). - carmoli77

    JS Photo FXInspiration for a rustic deck remodel in Atlanta with a fireplaceeverything but a different color wood - webuser_962983501

    Dave Clough PhotographyCoastal deck photo in Portland MaineOutdoor Shower... Modern, yet tropical walls. Also and over head light. - chateaudelims

    Deck - mediterranean deck idea in Los AngelesChairs and ottomans - megan2hunt

    Photo: Marni Epstein-Mervis 2018 HouzzTrendy deck photo in Los Angeles with a fire pitShape of pit to blend at pool edge - dutle

    Cut Coarse Stone is reminiscent of a saw-cut Turkish Limestone. The highly textural and yet contemporary linear-style installs with a clean, dry-stack application. This stone is the perfect scale for an efficient installation, appealing to both commercial and residential exteriors and interiors. The stones include three different heights of 3, 6 and 9 and various lengths from 12 to 24. The muted color palette is indicative of natural limestone.Stone: Cut Coarse Stone - OysterGet a Sample of Cut Coarse Stone: https://shop.eldoradostone.com/products/cut-coarse-stone-sample Love the lights + transparent patio door concept - tyrell_robertson

    Klassen PhotographyInspiration for a mid-sized rustic backyard dock remodel in Jackson with a roof extension - stefka_beikova

    Small elegant backyard deck photo in New York

    Matthew AndersonDeck - large contemporary rooftop deck idea in Kansas City with a fire pit and a roof extension

    Photo Credits: Julia LynnInspiration for a beach style backyard deck remodel in Charleston with a roof extensionnice outdoors, shade and sun area next to it - joclouder

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    Browse Thousands of Inspiring Decks on Houzz

    Yu-Gi-Oh!: Legendary Decks II Themed Starters (Yugi, Kaiba … - September 16, 2018 by admin

    ').appendTo(flyout.elem());var panelGroup=flyout.getName()+'SubCats';var hideTimeout=null;var sloppyTrigger=createSloppyTrigger($parent);var showParent=function(){if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} if(visible){return;} var height=$('#nav-flyout-shopAll').height(); $parent.css({'height': height});$parent.animate({width:'show'},{duration:200,complete:function(){$parent.css({overflow:'visible'});}});visible=true;};var hideParentNow=function(){$parent.stop().css({overflow:'hidden',display:'none',width:'auto',height:'auto'});panels.hideAll({group:panelGroup});visible=false;if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;}};var hideParent=function(){if(!visible){return;} if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} hideTimeout=setTimeout(hideParentNow,10);};flyout.onHide(function(){sloppyTrigger.disable();hideParentNow();this.elem().hide();});var addPanel=function($link,panelKey){var panel=dataPanel({className:'nav-subcat',dataKey:panelKey,groups:[panelGroup],spinner:false,visible:false});if(!flyoutDebug){var mouseout=mouseOutUtility();mouseout.add(flyout.elem());mouseout.action(function(){panel.hide();});mouseout.enable();} var a11y=a11yHandler({link:$link,onEscape:function(){panel.hide();$link.focus();}});var logPanelInteraction=function(promoID,wlTriggers){var logNow=$F.once().on(function(){var panelEvent=$.extend({},event,{id:promoID});if(config.browsePromos&&!!config.browsePromos[promoID]){panelEvent.bp=1;} logEvent(panelEvent);phoneHome.trigger(wlTriggers);});if(panel.isVisible()&&panel.hasInteracted()){logNow();}else{panel.onInteract(logNow);}};panel.onData(function(data){renderPromo(data.promoID,panel.elem());logPanelInteraction(data.promoID,data.wlTriggers);});panel.onShow(function(){var columnCount=$('.nav-column',panel.elem()).length;panel.elem().addClass('nav-colcount-'+columnCount);showParent();var $subCatLinks=$('.nav-subcat-links > a',panel.elem());var length=$subCatLinks.length;if(length>0){var firstElementLeftPos=$subCatLinks.eq(0).offset().left;for(var i=1;i'+ catTitle+'');panel.elem().prepend($subPanelTitle);}} $link.addClass('nav-active');});panel.onHide(function(){$link.removeClass('nav-active');hideParent();a11y.disable();sloppyTrigger.disable();});panel.onShow(function(){a11y.elems($('a, area',panel.elem()));});sloppyTrigger.register($link,panel);if(flyoutDebug){$link.click(function(){if(panel.isVisible()){panel.hide();}else{panel.show();}});} var panelKeyHandler=onKey($link,function(){if(this.isEnter()||this.isSpace()){panel.show();}},'keydown',false);$link.focus(function(){panelKeyHandler.bind();}).blur(function(){panelKeyHandler.unbind();});panel.elem().appendTo($parent);};var hideParentAndResetTrigger=function(){hideParent();sloppyTrigger.disable();};for(var i=0;i Add to Cart $199.95 & FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details

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    Konami Yu-Gi-Oh Legendary Deck II Box Each Legendary Decks II box set includes: - 43-card Deck based on Yugi and his unstoppable Exodia, the Forbidden One. For the first time in more than 8 years, brand-new cards to help assemble the five pieces of Exodia are included! This Deck ALSO contains all 3 playable versions of the Egyptian God Cards, available together in one place for the first time ever! - 43-card Deck based on Kaiba and his legendary engine of destruction, Blue-Eyes White Dragon! For Seto Kaiba, might always made right, so this Deck is packed with powerful monsters and destructive Spell and Trap Cards! - 43-card Deck based on Joey and his ferocious Red-Eyes B. Dragon! No one grew more as a Duelist and a person during the original series than Joey, so this Deck includes cards that grow and change from turn to turn like RedEyes Black Flare Dragon and Red-Eyes Archfiend of Lightning. - 3 brand-new Secret Rare cards to enhance Decks built around Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl: Eternal Soul, Dark Burning Attack, and Dark Burning Magic. - 3 Ultra Rare Token Cards. Each one depicts one of the three legendary Duelists of the original animated series with their signature monsters! What if Weevil never threw Yugi's Exodia cards overboard? Is there any way Kaiba could ever lose to Joey? Would Joey have been able to defeat all 3 Egyptian God Cards like Yugi did? With Legendary Decks II, players and fans of the original series can try out these fantasy scenarios while also grabbing cards that can power up strategies introduced in Clash of Rebellions, Breakers of Shadow, Shining Victories, The Dark Illusion, and Duelist Pack: Rivals of the Pharaoh!

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    Yu-Gi-Oh!: Legendary Decks II Themed Starters (Yugi, Kaiba ...

    17 Stunning Decks to Inspire Your Backyard Transformation … - July 29, 2018 by admin

    17 Stunning Decks to Inspire Your Backyard Transformation

    1Shaping Your Dream Deck

    Nary a backyard retreat is complete without a deck built for entertaining. Just like any indoor space, this exterior structure can be customized to your wants and needs. Multiple levels, shady overhead structures, and spa-like amenities are all within the realm of deck design possibilitywith a little planning. Take inspiration from these 17 creative deck ideas for a relaxing space built just for you. (Feel free to share it with others.)

    2Cedar and Glass Beauty

    Consider your deck an opportunity for a bonus room. Here, a diehard salvage fanatic used his findingsand years as a glass installerto bump out his entertaining space with a handsome deck sitting room.

    Pick up more ideas from the video tour of this reader's prize-winning cedar deck

    Find other ways to bring creature comforts outdoors by creating a room with a view

    3Hardscaping Paradise

    A young family turned a brick patio and decrepit deck into an inviting backyard escape that's safe for little ones. A sprawling deck provides ample room for secluded seating areas within a perimeter of mature ficus trees.

    See other ways the family outfitted the wood deck and brick patio area for playtime

    Check for any signs of trouble in an existing deck with this six-step plan

    5Low Height Standards

    6Wide Berth for Container Gardens

    8Sun-Blocking Pergolas

    9Standout Deck Stairs

    Photo by Courtesy of AmericanLighting.com

    Curved stairs and stone-surface landings provide a generous post to admire nearby water views. Chunky wood railing feels at home with the rustic setting.

    Create a safe path to backyards by replacing deck stair balusters or starting from scratch for new deck stairs

    10Rambling Composite Deck

    11Enchanted Deck Atmosphere

    12Glossy Traditional Style Deck

    13The Decks are Stacked

    A series of stepsand tons of fillreclaimed a backyard's steep incline. Double-decker decks provide views of the landscape and capitalize on what used to be a steep drop.

    See the transformation of the rest of this Shingle-Style house

    Take your entertaining outside with these 39 budget-wise outdoor room ideas

    14Walls Need Not Apply

    15Bright Beach House View

    A house-spanning beachfront deck with subtle railing allows a family ample outdoor time with unaffected ocean views. A retractable awning provides solace from harsh coastal sunrays.

    See before and after images of this beach house remodel

    Place shade where you want it with patio umbrellas

    16Luxurious Outdoor Kitchen

    An outdoor kitchen positioned against a wall makes it easier to connect electrical and plumbing. Plus, a sliding window above the countertop means easy passing of plates and other kitchen essentials. A second-floor deck creates more outdoor enjoyment, without the entertaining efforts.

    Make your open-air kitchen a prize-worthy cook space with this recipe for a great outdoor kitchen

    Add outdoor dining spaces in other places with smart ideas for outdoor kitchens and dining

    17Room for Steamy Relaxation

    Photo by Courtesy of CableRail by Feeney/Hometalk

    If your idea of paradise includes a hot soak outdoors after a long day, look no further. It's all about the view here, with a spa sunk low into the deck surface and encased in matching deck planks and subtle railings to keep the profile unintrusive and leafy views in check.

    See other deck railing options from Hometalk to fit your personality

    Other ways to take a vacation without leaving home

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    17 Stunning Decks to Inspire Your Backyard Transformation ...

    Deck (building) – Wikipedia - July 29, 2018 by admin

    For other uses, see Deck.

    In architecture, a deck is a flat surface capable of supporting weight, similar to a floor, but typically constructed outdoors, often elevated from the ground, and usually connected to a building. The term is a generalization of decks as found on ships.

    Wood or timber "decking" can be used in a number of ways: as part of garden landscaping, to extend living areas of houses, and as an alternative to stone based features such as patios. Decks are made from treated lumber, composite lumber, composite material, and Aluminum. Lumber may be Western red cedar, teak, mahogany, ip and other hardwoods. Recycled planks may be high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polystyrene (PS) and PET plastic as well as mixed plastics and wood fiber (often called "composite" lumber). Artificial decking products are often called "wood-plastic composites". These days, WPC's have more widely known by different brands like Trex, Azek, Ecornboard etc.

    Historically, the softwoods used for decking were logged from old growth forests. These include Atlantic white cedar, redwood and Western red cedar (redcedar). Atlantic City built the first coastal boardwalk in the United States, originally constructed of Atlantic white cedar. However, it was not long before the commercial logging of this tree and clearing of cedar swamps in New Jersey caused a decline in the availability of decking. Atlantic City and New York City both switched to Western red cedar. By the 1960s, Western red cedar from the US was declining due to over-logging. More expensive Western red cedar was available from western Canada (British Columbia) but by then, pressure treated pine had become available.

    But even with chemical treatments (such as chromated copper arsenate or CCA), pine decking is not as durable as cedars in an outdoor environment. Thus, many municipalities and homeowners are turning to hardwoods. Decks are often built from pressure treated wood. Pressure treated wood is long lasting and holds up to wet and icey weather conditions. Pressure treated wood however is treated with chemicals which have been known to be toxic.[1]

    Generally, hardwoods used for decking come from tropical forests. Much of the logging taking place to produce these woods, especially teak, mahogany and ip, is occurring illegally, as outlined in numerous reports by environmental organizations such as Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth and Rainforest Relief.[2][3][4] US tropical wood imports are rising, partly due to the demand for decking.

    Due to environmental and durability concerns, composite decking (a mixture of two materials, typically wood pulp and recycled material such as plastic bottles or plastic bags) have appeared on the market. Proponents of composite decking have touted this as a much needed development as this helps to curb logging of trees for new decks. However composite decking has been found to contain harmful chemicals, cannot be refurbished, and despite claims from decking companies, some composite decking still attracts mold. However newer more modern composites feature a cap or shell that prevents mold and staining.[5]

    Residential decks may contain spaces for cooking, dining and seating. Cooking areas ideally should be situated near the patio door while out of the way from general foot traffic. Dining spaces will include patio tables. For a typical 6 person outdoor patio table building an area of 12' x 16' (4x5 m) is ideal. If deck space is available, homeowners may choose to include a seating area for outdoor couches and benches.

    The deck of a house is generally a wooden platform built above the ground and connected to the main building. It is generally enclosed by a railing for safety. Access may be from the house through doors and from the ground via a stairway. Residential decks can be constructed over steep areas or rough ground that is otherwise unusable. Decks can also be covered by a canopy or pergola to control sunlight. Deck designs can be found in numerous books, do-it-yourself magazines and web sites, and from the USDA.[6]

    Typical construction is either of a post and beam architecture, or a cantilever construction. The post and beam construction relies on posts anchored to piers in the ground. Typically these types of structural decks are engineered and required an experienced construction company that specializes in structural decks. Cantilever decks rely on floor joists that protrude out further than the wall of the house. While this type of construction is common, it raises significant safety issues if the decks are not properly waterproofed and flashed. There have been a growing number deck failures resulting in death and critical injuries. Another key component of decks are code compliant railings. Railings on decks above 30 inches are considered guard rails. Guard rails have a specific building code requirement for both height and structural strength. Most U.S. commercial building codes require a 42-inch guardrail on decks, and 36 or 42 inches for residential code depending on the state. Typical railing assemblies must meet structural strength requirements of 200lbs of load force per foot. In short, decks are complex load bearing structures that most often require structural engineering, plans, and permits.

    Larger buildings may also have decks on the upper floors of the building which can be open to the public as observation decks or skyrise greenerys.

    A deck is also the surface used to construct a boardwalk over sand on barrier islands.

    Laying deck or throwing deck refers to the act of placing and bolting down cold-formed steel beneath roofing and concrete floors. This is usually done by an ironworker, sometimes in conjunction with a cement mason or carpenter. It regarded as one of the most physically demanding jobs in the iron working industry.

    In the UK the various ban on smoking in public buildings was expected lead to an increase in the use of timber decking for outdoor spaces where smokers can gather.[7]

    In multi-story commercial construction, the dominant form of deck (including roof deck) construction is composite steel deck.

    Roof deck is a term used in urban areas referring to deck structures built on top of existing building roofs. These spaces can be found on both commercial and residential buildings and are often utilized as urban landscape areas. With this trend in outdoor living increasing, many landscape architecture firms have begun to specialize in the design and construction of these specialized spaces.

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    Deck (building) - Wikipedia

    Deck (ship) – Wikipedia - July 9, 2018 by admin

    For other uses, see Deck.

    A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull[1] of a ship. On a boat or ship, the primary or upper deck is the horizontal structure that forms the "roof" of the hull, strengthening it and serving as the primary working surface. Vessels often have more than one level both within the hull and in the superstructure above the primary deck, similar to the floors of a multi-story building, that are also referred to as decks, as are certain compartments and decks built over specific areas of the superstructure. Decks for some purposes have specific names.

    The main purpose of the upper or primary deck is structural, and only secondarily to provide weather-tightness and support people and equipment. The deck serves as the lid to the complex box girder which is the hull. It resists tension, compression, and racking forces. The deck's scantling is usually the same as the topsides, or might be heavier if the deck is expected to carry heavier loads (for example a container ship). The deck will be reinforced around deck fittings such as the capstan, cleats, or bollards.

    On ships with more than one level, deck refers to the level itself. The actual floor surface is called the sole, the term deck refers to a structural member tying the ships frames or ribs together over the keel. In modern ships, the interior decks are usually numbered from the primary deck, which is #1, downward and upward. So the first deck below the primary deck will be #2, and the first above the primary deck will be #A2 or #S2 (for "Above" or "Superstructure"). Some merchant ships may alternatively designate decks below the primary deck, usually machinery spaces, by numbers, and those above it, in the accommodation block, by letters. Ships may also call decks by common names, or (especially on cruise ships) may invent fanciful and romantic names for a specific deck or area of that specific ship, such as the Lido deck of the Princess Cruises' Love Boat.

    Equipment mounted on deck, such as the ship's wheel, binnacle, fife rails, and so forth, may be collectively referred to as deck furniture. Weather decks in western designs evolved from having structures fore (forward or front) and aft (rear) of the ship mostly clear; in the 19th century, pilothouses/wheelhouses and deckhouses began to appear, eventually developing into the superstructure of modern ships. Eastern designs developed earlier, with efficient middle decks and minimalist fore and aft cabin structures across a range of designs.

    In vessels having more than one deck there are various naming conventions, numerically, alphabetically, etc. However, there are also various common historical names and types of decks:

    A traditional wood deck would consist of planks laid fore and aft over beams and along carlins, the seams of which are caulked and paid with tar. A yacht or other fancy boat might then have the deck canvased, with the fabric laid down in a thick layer of paint or sealant, and additional coats painted over. The wash or apron boards form the joint between the deck planking and that of the topsides, and are caulked similarly.

    Modern "constructed decks" are used primarily on fiberglass, composite, and cold-molded hulls. The under structure of beams and carlins is the same as above. The decking itself is usually multiple layers of marine-grade plywood, covered over with layers of fibreglass in a plastic resin such as epoxy or polyester overlapped onto the topsides of the hull.

    Generally speaking, the method outlined for "constructed decks" is most similar to metal decks. The deck plating is laid over metal beams and carlins and tacked temporarily in place. The difficulty in metal construction is avoiding distortion of the plate while welding due to the high heat involved in the process. Welds are usually double pass, meaning each seam is welded twice, a time consuming process which may take longer than building the wood deck. However, welds result in a waterproof deck which is strong and easily repairable. The deck structure is welded to the hull, making it structurally a single unit.

    Because a metal deck, painted to reduce corrosion, can pick up heat from the sun, and be quite slippery and noisy to work on, a layer of wood decking or thick non-skid paint is often applied to its surface.

    The process for building a deck in fiberglass is the same as for building a hull: a female mould is built, a layer of gel coat is sprayed in, then layers of fiberglass in resin are built up to the required deck thickness (if the deck has a core, the outer skin layers of fiberglass and resin are laid, then the core material, and finally the inner skin layers.) The deck is removed from the mould and usually mechanically fastened to the hull.

    Fiberglass decks are quite slick with their mirror-smooth surfaces, so a non-skid texture is often moulded into their surface, or non-skid pads glued down in working areas.

    The thickness of the decking affects how strong the hull is, and is directly related to how thick the skin of the hull itself is, which is of course related to how large the vessel is, the kind of work it is expected to do, and the kind of weather it may reasonably be expected to endure. While a naval engineer or architect may have precise methods of determining what the scantlings should be, traditional builders used previous experiences and simpler rules-of-thumb to determine how thick the deck should be built.

    The numbers derived by these formulae gives a rough number for determining the average thickness of materials based on some crude hull measurements. Below the waterline the thickness should be approximately 115% of the result, while upper topsides and decks might be reduced to 85% of the result.

    Source:[12]

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    Deck (ship) - Wikipedia

    Timbercraft – Specialists in Timber construction. Roof … - July 3, 2018 by admin

    In their individual capacities and as a collective the partners Jim Bunyan & Denvin Lucas together with Manager Theo Jurgens combine their talents to make your building experience memorable and enjoyable as they make your dream a reality.

    Over the past 35 years Timbercraft have built free standing homes in all conceivable sizes ranging from beach cottages and granny flats to multi storey homes.

    We work throughout the Cape Peninsula and although we specialize in Roof Room conversions we pride ourselves in being structural timber specialists.

    If its been done before weve done it

    If its never been done before phone us and it soon will be

    We offer a wide range of services:New Timber Homes, One bedroom to complete top floors, Loft Rooms, Parental Suites, Penthouses on apartment building roofs, Granny flats, Studios and offices, Export containerised homes in kit form

    Jim Bunyan(Partner) 083 252 2268Over 35 years at the forefront of the timber frame building industry. Founder member, former Vice President and President of the Timber Builders Association.Honaray member of the ITFB.

    Denvin Lucas (Partner) 076 074 0763Over 20 years carpentry and joinery experience.Joined Timbercraft in 2008 and is a current committee member of the ITC Western Cape.

    .

    Theo Jurgens (Partner) 082 556 130615 Years timber frame building experienceJoined Timbercraft in 2011 where he is the current manager

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    Timbercraft - Specialists in Timber construction. Roof ...

    Playing card – Wikipedia - June 25, 2018 by admin

    "Deck of cards" redirects here. For the recitation song that was popularized during the late 1940s, see The Deck of Cards."Pack of cards" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Pack o' Cards.

    A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China during the Tang dynasty.[1]

    Playing cards may have been invented during the Tang dynasty around the 9th century AD as a result of the usage of woodblock printing technology.[2][3][4][5][6] The first possible reference to card games comes from a 9th-century text known as the Collection of Miscellanea at Duyang, written by Tang dynasty writer Su E. It describes Princess Tongchang, daughter of Emperor Yizong of Tang, playing the "leaf game" in 868 with members of the clan of Wei Baoheng, the family of the princess' husband.[4][7][8]:131 The first known book on the "leaf" game was called the Yezi Gexi and allegedly written by a Tang woman. It received commentary by writers of subsequent dynasties.[9] The Song dynasty (9601279) scholar Ouyang Xiu (10071072) asserts that the "leaf" game existed at least since the mid-Tang dynasty and associated its invention with the development of printed sheets as a writing medium.[9][4] However, Ouyang also claims that the "leaves" were pages of a book used in a board game played with dice, and that the rules of the game were lost by 1067.[10]

    Other games revolving around alcoholic drinking involved using playing cards of a sort from the Tang dynasty onward. However, these cards did not contain suits or numbers. Instead, they were printed with instructions or forfeits for whomever drew them.[10]

    The earliest dated instance of a game involving cards with suits and numerals occurred on 17 July 1294 when "Yan Sengzhu and Zheng Pig-Dog were caught playing cards [zhi pai] and that wood blocks for printing them had been impounded, together with nine of the actual cards."[10]

    William Henry Wilkinson suggests that the first cards may have been actual paper currency which doubled as both the tools of gaming and the stakes being played for,[3] similar to trading card games. Using paper money was inconvenient and risky so they were substituted by play money known as "money cards". One of the earliest games in which we know the rules is Madiao, a trick-taking game, which dates to the Ming Dynasty (13681644). Fifteenth century scholar Lu Rong described it is as being played with 38 "money cards" divided into four suits: 9 in coins, 9 in strings of coins (which may have been misinterpreted as sticks from crude drawings), 9 in myriads (of coins or of strings), and 11 in tens of myriads (a myriad is 10,000). The two latter suits had Water Margin characters instead of pips on them [8]:132 with Chinese characters to mark their rank and suit. The suit of coins is in reverse order with 9 of coins being the lowest going up to 1 of coins as the high card.[11]

    Despite the wide variety of patterns, the suits show a uniformity of structure. Every suit contains twelve cards with the top two usually being the court cards of king and vizier and the bottom ten being pip cards. Half the suits use reverse ranking for their pip cards. There are many motifs for the suit pips but some include coins, clubs, jugs, and swords which resemble later Mamluk and Latin suits. Michael Dummett speculated that Mamluk cards may have descended from an earlier deck which consisted of 48 cards divided into four suits each with ten pip cards and two court cards.[12]

    By the 11th century, playing cards were spreading throughout the Asian continent and later came into Egypt.[8]:309 The oldest surviving cards in the world are four fragments found in the Keir Collection and one in the Benaki Museum. They are dated to the 12th and 13th centuries (late Fatimid, Ayyubid, and early Mamluk periods).[13]

    A near complete pack of Mamluk playing cards dating to the 15th century and of similar appearance to the fragments above was discovered by Leo Aryeh Mayer in the Topkap Palace, Istanbul, in 1939.[14] It is not a complete set and is actually composed of three different packs, probably to replace missing cards.[15] The Topkap pack originally contained 52 cards comprising four suits: polo-sticks, coins, swords, and cups. Each suit contained ten pip cards and three court cards, called malik (king), n'ib malik (viceroy or deputy king), and thn n'ib (second or under-deputy). The thn n'ib is a non-existent title so it may not have been in the earliest versions; without this rank, the Mamluk suits would structurally be the same as a Ganjifa suit. In fact, the word "Kanjifah" appears in Arabic on the king of swords and is still used in parts of the Middle East to describe modern playing cards. Influence from further east can explain why the Mamluks, most of whom were Central Asian Turkic Kipchaks, called their cups tuman which means myriad in Turkic, Mongolian and Jurchen languages.[16] Wilkinson postulated that the cups may have been derived from inverting the Chinese and Jurchen ideogram for myriad ().

    The Mamluk court cards showed abstract designs or calligraphy not depicting persons possibly due to religious proscription in Sunni Islam, though they did bear the ranks on the cards. N'ib would be borrowed into French (nahipi), Italian (naibi), and Spanish (naipes), the latter word still in common usage. Panels on the pip cards in two suits show they had a reverse ranking, a feature found in Madiao, Ganjifa, and old European card games like Ombre, Tarot, and Maw.[17]

    A fragment of two uncut sheets of Moorish-styled cards of a similar but plainer style were found in Spain and dated to the early 15th century.[18]

    Export of these cards (from Cairo, Alexandria, and Damascus), ceased after the fall of the Mamluks in the sixteenth century.[19] The rules to play these games are lost but they are believed to be plain trick games without trumps.[20]

    Four-suited playing cards are first attested in Southern Europe in 1365,[10] and are likely derived from the Mamluk suits of cups, coins, swords, and polo-sticks, which are still used in traditional Latin decks.[21] As polo was an obscure sport to Europeans then, the polo-sticks became batons or cudgels.[22] Their presence is attested in Catalonia in 1371, 1377 in Switzerland, and 1380 in many locations including Florence and Paris.[23][24][25] Wide use of playing cards in Europe can, with some certainty, be traced from 1377 onwards.[26]

    In the account books of Johanna, Duchess of Brabant and Wenceslaus I, Duke of Luxembourg, an entry dated May 14, 1379 reads: "Given to Monsieur and Madame four peters, two forms, value eight and a half moutons, wherewith to buy a pack of cards". In his book of accounts for 1392 or 1393, Charles or Charbot Poupart, treasurer of the household of Charles VI of France, records payment for the painting of three sets of cards.[27]

    From about 1418 to 1450[28] professional card makers in Ulm, Nuremberg, and Augsburg created printed decks. Playing cards even competed with devotional images as the most common uses for woodcuts in this period. Most early woodcuts of all types were coloured after printing, either by hand or, from about 1450 onwards, stencils. These 15th-century playing cards were probably painted. The Flemish Hunting Deck, held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art is the oldest complete set of ordinary playing cards made in Europe from the fifteenth century.[29]

    As cards spread from Italy to Germanic countries, the Latin suits were replaced with the suits of Leaves (or Shields), Hearts (or Roses), Bells, and Acorns, and a combination of Latin and Germanic suit pictures and names resulted in the French suits of trfles (clovers), carreaux (tiles), curs (hearts), and piques (pikes) around 1480. The trfle (clover) was probably derived from the acorn and the pique (pike) from the leaf of the German suits. The names pique and spade, however, may have derived from the sword (spade) of the Italian suits.[30] In England, the French suits were eventually used, although the earliest packs circulating may have had Latin suits.[31] This may account for why the English called the clovers "clubs" and the pikes "spades".

    In the late 14th century, Europeans changed the Mamluk court cards to represent European royalty and attendants. In a description from 1377, the earliest courts were originally a seated "King", an upper marshal that held his suit symbol up, and a lower marshal that held it down.[32][33] The latter two correspond with the Ober and Unter cards found in German and Swiss playing cards. The Italians and Iberians replaced the Ober/Unter system with the "Knight" and "Fante" or "Sota" before 1390, perhaps to make the cards more visually distinguishable. In England, the lowest court card was called the "Knave" which originally meant male child (compare German Knabe), so in this context the character could represent the "prince", son to the King and Queen; the meaning servant developed later.[34][35] Queens appeared sporadically in packs as early as 1377, especially in Germany. Although the Germans abandoned the Queen before the 1500s, the French permanently picked it up and placed it under the King. Packs of 56 cards containing in each suit a King, Queen, Knight, and Knave (as in tarot) were once common in the 15th century.

    During the mid 16th century, Portuguese traders introduced playing cards to Japan. The first indigenous Japanese deck was the Tensh karuta named after the Tensh period.[36]

    Packs with corner and edge indices (i.e. the value of the card printed at the corner(s) of the card) enabled players to hold their cards close together in a fan with one hand (instead of the two hands previously used[citation needed]). The first such pack known with Latin suits was printed by Infirerra and dated 1693,[37] but this feature was commonly used only from the end of the 18th century. The first Anglo-American deck with this innovation was the Saladee's Patent, printed by Samuel Hart in 1864. In 1870, he and his cousins at Lawrence & Cohen followed up with the Squeezers, the first cards with indices that had a large diffusion.[38]

    This was followed by the innovation of reversible court cards. This invention is attributed to a French card maker of Agen in 1745. But the French government, which controlled the design of playing cards, prohibited the printing of cards with this innovation. In central Europe (Trappola cards) and Italy (Tarocco Bolognese) the innovation was adopted during the second half of the 18th century. In Great Britain, the pack with reversible court cards was patented in 1799 by Edmund Ludlow and Ann Wilcox. The Anglo-American pack with this design was printed around 1802 by Thomas Wheeler.[39]

    Sharp corners wear out more quickly, and could possibly reveal the card's value, so they were replaced with rounded corners. Before the mid-19th century, British, American, and French players preferred blank backs. The need to hide wear and tear and to discourage writing on the back led cards to have designs, pictures, photos, or advertising on the reverse.[40][41]

    The United States introduced the Joker into the deck. It was devised for the game of Euchre, which spread from Europe to America beginning shortly after the American Revolutionary War. In Euchre, the highest trump card is the Jack of the trump suit, called the right bower (from the German Bauer); the second-highest trump, the left bower, is the Jack of the suit of the same color as trumps. The joker was invented c. 1860 as a third trump, the imperial or best bower, which ranked higher than the other two bowers.[42] The name of the card is believed to derive from juker, a variant name for Euchre.[43][44] The earliest reference to a Joker functioning as a wild card dates to 1875 with a variation of poker.[45]

    Contemporary playing cards are grouped into three broad categories based on the suits they use: French, Latin, and Germanic. Latin suits are used in the closely related Spanish and Italian formats. The Swiss-German suits are distinct enough to merit their subcategory. Excluding Jokers and Tarot trumps, the French 52-card deck preserves the number of cards in the original Mamluk deck, while Latin and Germanic decks average fewer. Latin decks usually drop the higher-valued pip cards, while Germanic decks drop the lower-valued ones.

    Within suits, there are regional or national variations called "standard patterns." Because these patterns are in the public domain, this allows multiple card manufacturers to recreate them.[46] Pattern differences are most easily found in the face cards but the number of cards per deck, the use of numeric indices, or even minor shape and arrangement differences of the pips can be used to distinguish them. Some patterns have been around for hundreds of years. Jokers are not part of any pattern as they are a relatively recent invention and lack any standardized appearance so each publisher usually puts their own trademarked illustration into their decks. The wide variation of jokers has turned them into collectible items. Any card that bore the stamp duty like the ace of spades in England or the ace of clubs in France are also collectible as that is where the manufacturer's logo is usually placed.

    French decks come in a variety of patterns and deck sizes. The 52-card deck is the most popular deck and includes 13 ranks of each suit with reversible "court" or face cards. Each suit includes an Ace, depicting a single symbol of its suit, a King, Queen, and Jack, each depicted with a symbol of their suit; and ranks two through ten, with each card depicting that number of pips of its suit. As well as these 52 cards, commercial packs often include between one and six jokers, most often two.

    Decks with less than 52 cards are known as stripped decks. The piquet pack has all values from 2 through 6 in each suit removed for a total of 32 cards. It is popular in France, the Low Countries, Central Europe and Russia and is used to play Piquet, Belote, Bezique and Skat. Forty-card French suited packs are common in northwest Italy; these remove the 8s through 10s like Latin suited decks. 24 card decks, removing 2s through 8s are also sold in Austria and Bavaria to play Schnapsen.

    A pinochle deck consists of two copies of each of the 9, 10, jack, queen, king, and ace cards of all four suits. It thus comprises just 48 cards per deck.

    The 78 card Tarot Nouveau adds the Knight card between Queens and Jacks along with 21 numbered trumps and the unnumbered Fool.

    The Unicode standard for text encoding on computers defines 8 characters for card suits in the Miscellaneous Symbols block, at U+26602667. Unicode 7.0 added a unified pack for French-suited Tarot Nouveau's trump cards and the 52 cards of the modern French pack, with 4 Knights, together with a character for "Playing Card Back" and black, red, and white jokers in the block U+1F0A01F0FF.[47]

    Geographic origin:

    Types of decks:

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    Terminology:

    Sources for further information:

    Playing card societies (collectors and researchers)

    History of playing cards

    Playing card iconography

    Museums, Institutes and Organisations

    Playing card collections online

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    Designing Playing cards

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    Playing card - Wikipedia

    Decks.com. Free Plans & Deck Design Software - June 24, 2018 by admin

    Designing and building a deck can be a fun and rewarding experience. But with any home improvement project it is important to always consider safety first. Please carefully read and accept the terms of use before we get started.

    The deck designer and related plans are to be used as an educational guide and not to be considered a finalized deck building plan. It is your responsibility to verify the accuracy and compliance with your local building codes and site conditions.

    Decks.com accepts no liability for any damages including personal injuries or property losses for the information published from the decks.com deck designer. We cannot anticipate your entire field working conditions or the characteristics of your building materials and tools. Consider your skill level and use caution and good judgement when using this information. If you have questions or concerns consult with your local building inspector, engineer or architect. Always obtain the necessary building permits and follow local codes and guidelines.

    Be sure to follow the building plans and instructions carefully. You are responsible for ensuring that the measurements and design are correct. Due to the size, shape, height, site location, anticipated use and other factors you may be required to install additional structural support including knee bracing or bridging between joists that isnt included in the decks.com designer, related plans and construction guide. You are responsible for verifying that the design and any modifications you make meet local building codes.

    Decks.com accepts no liability or responsibility for your design, construction or the use of any products supplied by Decks.com.

    You assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the decks.com deck designer.

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