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    Job Summary: The Gutter Installer is responsible for all aspects – goskagit.com - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Job Summary: The Gutter Installer is responsible for all aspects of installing company products according to work order, manufacturer, quality and safety guidelines. The Gutter Installer is also responsible for observing and following all OSHA and Company Safety policies and procedures. Experience: Previous experience is desirable but not required. Experience in the construction industry, including roofing, siding preferred. ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS: *Gutter installers must be able to use common hand tools - snips, down spout crimps, end cap crimps, hacksaw, hammer, cordless hand drill, blow torch and caulking gun. *Able to read job instructions and load truck with materials to work order. *Basic math skills required *Must be able to drive a box truck, have a valid insurable driver*s license. *Manage extension ladders up to 45 Ft., and must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. frequently. *Able to climb up and down a ladder. Comfortable with heights and working on/from ladders and roofs *Must be able to bend, twist, and turn body at shoulders, waist and knees to handle and install gutters. Must be able to stand for extended periods of time. *Maintain safe and clean work environment *Perform routine maintenance and keep trucks clean *Track equipment and supplies Work Environment: Works in a construction environment; able to work outdoors in all weather conditions.

    Link:
    Job Summary: The Gutter Installer is responsible for all aspects - goskagit.com

    Foundation Maintenance: Avoiding a Costly Home Repair – Mint Hill Times - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    When you become an owner of a home, foundation maintenance cannot be ignored. If you end up with a foundation crack or other damage, the repair cost will likely be very high. About $12.5 billion are spent on foundation repairs every year.

    Foundation issues can often be prevented. Usually, a lack of preventative maintenance causes most issues. Here are some of the foundation maintenance tasks you can take on to ensure you dont end up with a massive repair bill.

    1. Annual Foundation Inspections

    Having your foundation inspected every year is one of the easiest ways you can prevent damage. You can learn how to do it yourself or hire a professional to come out and do an inspection. Either way, taking the time to look at your foundation will help you to see if there is an issue.

    Its a good idea to check around your foundation after a big rainstorm, as well. You will be able to see if the water is pooling in specific areas where drainage may not be great.

    2. Compact Backfill Areas

    When a home is built, backfill areas are created to allow water to drain away from the foundation. These areas are usually filled with loose soil and created with a slope away from the foundation.

    Over time, the soil may flatten leading to ponding around the foundation. Homeowners should use a heavy piece of wood to tamp down the backfill areas. Adding more soil may be necessary to maintain the proper slope.

    3. Annual Inspection of Other Concrete Structures

    Patios, driveways, and sidewalks can act as a barrier to help protect the foundation. However, they can also cause foundation damage, if they become cracked or damaged from moisture.

    Every year, you should inspect these structures and look for cracks, pooling of water, and other potential issues. This is most important during the first five years of owning a new home since the foundation will adjust the most during this time.

    4. Make Sure Gutters and Downspouts Work Properly

    Usually, you need to clean the gutters at least twice a year; once before the winter season and once in the spring. Clean gutters and downspouts will work together to move water from the roof away from your home. They are a great defense system for your home.

    However, if your gutters or downspouts become clogged, you could end up with a very big issue. Clogged gutters lead to the pooling of water on the roof, which can lead to major issues. Downspouts can also become clogged causing even bigger issues.

    Along with clogging, gutters and downspouts not installed correctly may cause water to pool in specific areas around your foundation. Make sure the downspouts are installed with the proper slope so water moves away from the foundation and doesnt come back

    There are many things you should pay attention to when it comes to foundation maintenance. A proper inspection each year will go a long way to ensure you dont end up with a huge repair bill.

    I would love to be part of your journey when the time is right for you. If you ever have a real estate question or need, or know someone who does, trust that you can turn to me. I will help you make the right move! Anna Granger 704-650-5707 | annagrangerhomes@gmail.com | http://www.1stchoicepropertiesinc.com

    Read this article:
    Foundation Maintenance: Avoiding a Costly Home Repair - Mint Hill Times

    Information from around the county: backyard chickens, water conversation, homeless assistance – The West Volusia Beacon - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Learn how to raise backyard chickens!

    Keeping chickens and producing your own eggs can be rewarding, therapeutic and loads of fun.

    Learn how to get started during an online Backyard Urban Chicken Program from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 24, on Zoom.

    Kalan Taylor, an agriculture and natural resources agent for the University of Florida/Volusia County Extension, will discuss chicken breeds, housing, health care, nutrition, manure management and food safety. She will also explain how to find out if your property is approved for chicken farming.

    The $10 registration fee includes a certificate and teaching materials. To register, go to http://www.eventbrite.com and type in backyard urban chicken program. Registrants will receive the Zoom link on June 23.

    For registration questions, contact Cynthia Rabey at 386-822-5778 or cynthia.rabey@ufl.edu.

    Watch the weather, wait to water

    Volusia Countys Environmental Management Division is encouraging residents who irrigate their lawns to take advantage of the summer rainy season and watch the weather, wait to water.

    From July through September, yards need no more than a half-inch to three-quarters inch of water up to two times a week. If your lawn has received enough water from rainfall, turn off the irrigation system and turn it back on when needed.

    The simplest way to determine if your yard needs water is to look for these visual clues:

    Grass blades are folded in half lengthwise on at least one-third of your yard.

    Grass blades appear blue-gray.

    Grass blades do not spring back, leaving footprints on the lawn for several minutes after walking on it.

    If your yard is showing signs that it needs water, check your local forecast to see if rain is on the way.

    Use a rain gauge to determine how much rain your yard has received.

    Install a rain sensor on your automatic irrigation system, and make sure its working properly.

    Take full advantage of the rain. Make sure gutter downspouts are directed into landscaped areas or lawn.

    Install a rain barrel to capture excess rainwater.

    According to Volusia Countys water conservation ordinance, residents may water their lawns twice a week (if necessary) until standard time resumes Nov. 1, when the once-a-week schedule will return.

    People who live at odd-numbered addresses may water Wednesdays and Saturdays, and people at even-numbered addresses may water Thursdays and Sundays. Businesses may water Tuesdays and Fridays. Each zone of your irrigation system may be watered no more than one hour or three-quarters of an inch a day. Watering is not permitted between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

    The watering restrictions apply to all county residents, including those who live inside city limits. They cover city and county water, private wells and pumps, but do not include reclaimed water.

    For more information about water conservation, visit volusia.org/water-conservation.

    CARES Act funds available for homeless assistance

    Volusia County has received nearly $450,000 in federal funds that are available to nonprofit organizations that are working to lessen the impacts of COVID-19 in the homeless population. Application for the funds, a total of $449,809, are being accepted through June 30. The money comes from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developments Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) and are part of the federal coronavirus relief, or CARES Act. The money is designed to help prevent, prepare for and respond to the coronavirus pandemic among individuals and families who are homeless or are receiving homeless assistance.

    Not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organizations are eligible to submit responses for these special funds, which can be used for:

    Emergency shelter renovation: $125,000

    Emergency shelter operations: $50,000

    Street outreach: $54,809

    Rapid re-housing: $220,000

    All programs must serve the entire county and comply with the Commission on Homelessness for Volusia and Flagler Counties written standards. Use of Volusia County ESG funds is limited to Volusia County only.

    Applications will be accepted through 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 30. Applications, including the written standards, are available by calling Edina Toth at 386-736-5955, ext. 12908, or 386-564-0387.

    Continue reading here:
    Information from around the county: backyard chickens, water conversation, homeless assistance - The West Volusia Beacon

    Moore: I’m back in the worm business – Longview News-Journal - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Ive always worked at least two, sometimes three jobs. My dad said it built character. Maybe so, but what I noticed was it built my bank account.

    In 1972 when I was 11, I began mowing yards, raking leaves or doing anything else that paid. There were plenty of elderly folks in my hometown who were no longer able to do this type of work and I was only too glad to help them.

    That same year a man in my hometown hired me for $1 a day to help him in his bait shop.

    Mr. Bill (I dont think I ever knew his last name) was a jack of all trades. In addition to growing worms and raising minnows, he made the signs for the local grocery stores that hung in the windows and advertised the weekly specials.

    While I broke up the dirt in the worm beds and ground the cornmeal to feed them, Mr. Bill would pull a piece of butcher paper and tear it off from the roll that hung on the wall and freehand the name of the item for sale in one color and its price in another.

    As I ran the loud grinder for the cornmeal, Id watch him finish one sign, hang it up to dry and begin another. Every now and then hed yell out to me, telling me to use less meal, or to remind me to mist the beds with water before feeding them.

    All of this came back to me as my wife and I recently discovered hundreds of earthworms in our concrete gutters at the top of our two driveways.

    Our property is a rectangle, but from front to back its shaped like a bowl. We installed the concrete drains to catch and redirect the runoff during heavy rains. When we bought the property, we noticed that when it rained hard, our driveways turned into Niagara Falls. In turn, the water ran through the yard and washed away just about anything in its path.

    We hired lots of folks who said they could fix the problem, but it was my idea to install the concrete gutters deep in the ground and top them with metal grates. I remembered a design Id seen as a kid. At the top of the driveway, a deep concrete gutter ran the width of the drive and removable metal grates covered them. The runoff ran into drainage ditches, which went into a creek.

    I hired a fella to build the same thing.

    The first rain came, and it worked great. So did the second, and the third. But by the fourth heavy rain, we noticed the dirt from the runoff had filled the concrete gutters and was coming up through the grates.

    I pulled a shooter shovel from the garage and began to scoop out the dirt into a wheelbarrow. My intention was to use this fertile soil in my wifes garden. There was only one problem. We had guests. They had moved into the gutters and were calling them home.

    Worms. Earthworms. Lots of them.

    The loose, black soil and the cool, underground concrete gutters provided the perfect domicile for one of the earths most basic creatures. These round, segmented organisms eat, digest, and redistribute things that help farmers and gardeners grow food. They also provide food for pigs and other farm animals.

    Of course, fishermen rely on them to catch what they need to fill their freezers.

    Which brings me to the next part of this story.

    My wife mentioned that a friend of ours at the end of the street buys worms and that they were expensive.

    He and his wife arrived and took about half of the worms and headed back home.

    The rest of the worms went into my wifes gardens. But the wheels in my old noggin started turning.

    What had started out as a drainage problem has turned into a business opportunity. I currently only have a couple of jobs, so I have an opening for another one. One that I first learned at age 11.

    Im going to call it, Johns Grate Bait.

    John Moore is a Whitehouse resident. His column appears Friday. His books, Write of Passage: A Southerners View of Then and Now, and Write of Passage Volume II, are available from Amazon, and TheCountryWriter.com. His weekly podcast appears on Spotify and iTunes. Email john@johnmoore.net .

    More here:
    Moore: I'm back in the worm business - Longview News-Journal

    John Moore: Worm weather | Opinion – Marshall News Messenger - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Ive always worked at least two, sometimes three jobs. My dad said it built character. Maybe so, but what I noticed was that it built my bank account.

    In 1972 when I was 11, I began mowing yards, raking leaves, or doing anything else that paid. There were plenty of elderly folks in my hometown who were no longer able to do this type of work, and I was only too glad to help them.

    That same year a man in my hometown hired me for $1 a day to help him in his bait shop.

    Mr. Bill (I dont think I ever knew his last name) was a jack-of-all-trades. In addition to growing worms and raising minnows, he also made the signs for the local grocery stores that hung in the windows and advertised the weekly specials.

    While I broke up the dirt in the worm beds and ground the cornmeal to feed them, Mr. Bill would pull a piece of butcher paper and tear it off from the roll that hung on the wall, and then free hand the name of the item for sale in one color and its price in another.

    As I ran the loud grinder for the cornmeal, Id watch him finish one sign, hang it up to dry, and begin another.

    Every now and then hed yell out to me, telling me to use less meal to feed the worms, or to remind me to mist the beds with water before feeding them.

    All of this came back to me as my wife and I recently discovered hundreds of earthworms in our concrete gutters that we installed at the top of our two driveways.

    Our property is a rectangle, but from front to back, its shaped like a bowl. We installed the concrete drains to catch and redirect the runoff during heavy rains.

    When we bought the property, we noticed that when it rained hard, our driveways turned into Niagara Falls. In turn, the water ran through the yard and washed away just about anything in its path.

    We hired lots of folks who said they could fix the problem, but it was my idea to install the concrete gutters, deep into the ground and top them with metal grates.

    I remembered a design Id seen as a kid. At the top of the driveway, a deep concrete gutter ran the width of the drive, and removable metal grates covered them.

    The runoff ran into drainage ditches, which went into a creek.

    I hired a fella to build the same thing.

    The first rain came, and it worked great. So did the second, and the third.

    But by the fourth heavy rain, we noticed the dirt from the runoff had filled the concrete gutters and was coming up through the grates.

    I pulled a shooter shovel from the garage and began to scoop out the dirt into a wheelbarrow. My intention was to use this fertile soil in my wifes garden.

    There was only one problem. We had guests. They had moved into the gutters and were now calling them home.

    Worms. Earthworms. Lots of them.

    The loose, black soil and the cool, underground concrete gutters provided the perfect domicile for one of the earths most basic creatures.

    These round, segmented organisms eat, digest, and redistribute things that help farmers and gardeners grow food.

    They also provide food for pigs and other farm animals.

    Of course, fishermen rely on them to catch what they need to fill their freezers.

    Which brings me to the next part of this story.

    My wife mentioned that a friend of ours at the end of the street buys worms and that they were expensive.

    He and his wife arrived and took about half of the worms and headed back home.

    The rest of the worms went into my wifes gardens.

    But the wheels in my old noggin started turning.

    What had started out as a drainage problem has turned into a business opportunity. I currently only have a couple of jobs, so I have an opening for another one. One that I first learned at age 11.

    Im going to call it, Johns Grate Bait.

    John Moores books, Write of Passage: A Southerners View of Then and Now Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, are available on Amazon and on Johns website at http://www.TheCountryWriter.com. His weekly John G. Moore Podcast appears on Spotify and iTunes.

    Read more from the original source:
    John Moore: Worm weather | Opinion - Marshall News Messenger

    How to Protect the Most Vulnerable Parts of Your Home From Wildfires – NBC Southern California - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Several brush fires have burned this week on Southern California hillsides as temperatures rise and humidity levels drop, stark reminders of the threat posed to neighborhoods by fast-moving wildfires.

    Residents should be prepared for a continued threat from wildfires as we enter the hot and dry summer months.

    Below are some ways you can harden your home from the roof on down and make it more fire resistant.

    Roof

    The roof is the most vulnerable part of your home. Homes with wood or shingle roofs are at high risk of being destroyed during a wildfire. Build your roof or re-roof with materials such as composition, metal or tile. Block any spaces between roof decking and covering to prevent embers from catching.

    Vents

    Vents on homes create openings for flying embers.

    Eaves and Soffits

    Eaves and soffits should be protected with ignition-resistant* or non-combustible materials.

    Windows

    Heat from a wildfire can cause windows to break even before the home is on fire. This allows burning embers to enter and start fires inside. Single-paned and large windows are particularly vulnerable.

    Walls

    Wood products, such as boards, panels or shingles, are common siding materials. However, they are flammable and not good choices for fire-prone areas.

    Decks

    Surfaces within 10 feet of the building should be built with ignition-resistant, non-combustible, or other approved materials.

    Rain Gutters

    Keep rain gutters clear or enclose rain gutters to prevent accumulation of plant debris.

    Patio Cover

    Use the same ignition-resistant materials for patio coverings as a roof.

    Chimney

    Cover your chimney and stovepipe outlets with a non-flammable screen. Use metal screen material with openings no smaller than 3/8-inch and no larger than 1/2-inch to prevent embers from escaping and igniting a fire.

    Garage

    Have a fire extinguisher and tools such as a shovel, rake, bucket, and hose available for fire emergencies.

    Fences

    Consider using ignition-resistant* or non-combustible fence materials to protect your home during a wildfire.

    Driveways and Access Roads

    Driveways should be built and maintained in accordance with state and local codes to allow fire and emergency vehicles to reach your home. Consider maintaining access roads with a minimum of 10 feet of clearance on either side, allowing for two-way traffic.

    Address

    Make sure your address is clearly visible from the road.

    Water Supply

    Consider having multiple garden hoses that are long enough to reach all areas of your home and other structures on your property. If you have a pool or well, consider getting a pump.

    Sam DiGiovanna is a 35-year fire service veteran. He started with the Los Angeles County Fire Department, served as Fire Chief at the Monrovia Fire Department and currently serves as Chief at the Verdugo Fire Academy in Glendale.

    View original post here:
    How to Protect the Most Vulnerable Parts of Your Home From Wildfires - NBC Southern California

    Affordable Starter Homes in the Park Hills Area – Corvallis Gazette Times - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Webster Groves Ranch, super cute exterior, large front tree for optimal shade. Living room entry, warm inviting paint color, gleaming hardwood floors, large windows for optimal natural light. Great eat-in kitchen, stainless steel appliances, mosaic tiled back splash, custom cabinets. Two bedrooms, both with ample closet space, hardwood floors, ceiling fans. Modern full bathroom. Spacious finished walk-out basement, utility room, over sized closet, plush carpeting. Impressive fenced backyard oasis featuring covered patio for outdoor entertaining, potential areas for gardening, shed to house lawn equipment, and fire pit for hosting evening get-togethers. Home was fully renovated 5 years ago and brand new roof in 2017. Convenient location! 15 minutes to Downtown, Zoo, Science Center, City Museum, the Magic House. Walking distance to restaurants and shopping, plus Blackburn Park. Quiet neighborhood, great neighbors, welcome home!

    View Listing

    Originally posted here:
    Affordable Starter Homes in the Park Hills Area - Corvallis Gazette Times

    Grand Junction crews out chip sealing roads | Western Colorado – The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    The annual summer tradition of chip-sealing Grand Junction roads has begun again.

    Grand Junction Public Works Director Trent Prall said city crews began chip-sealing work May 31, and will take around eight weeks to complete the maintenance. The primary locations that will be chip sealed this year are west of 25 Road and north of Interstate 70 Business within the city limits.

    (Chip sealing) puts a small 3/8th inch crushed rock over a thin layer of asphalt or oil, Prall said. Then we put another layer overtop of that to form that chip seal. So that seals up our roads and tries to keep the moisture out of the roads and into the gutters and into the storm drains.

    For the chip-sealing program, Prall said the department has broken up the city into 12 areas and then rotates through each area, taking on one per year. In addition to that work Prall said the city now chip seals new roads and roads that are given an overlay of new asphalt within a couple years of that work.

    The standard of care now is that once you pave a street, like with an overlay or a brand new street like Seventh Street, that you come back within a couple years and you put a chip seal over top of it, Prall said. That leaves that top part of the structure pretty moist, if you will, with oil.

    Chip sealing is a cost efficient way to maintain roads, Prall said. Chip-sealing costs around $1.50 per square yard, Prall said, whereas an overlay costs around $15 a square yard and reconstructing a road costs between $75 and $120 a square yard.

    There are some road overlay projects in the works this summer, Prall said. Those began around the same time as chip sealing and will take between eight and 10 weeks. While city staff performs the chip sealing work, the city contracts out for road overlay work. There are no street reconstruction projects this year, Prall said.

    Were trying to get it back up to a more sustainable level where our chip seals are a lot more effective in keeping our roads sealed up and not have so many streets that need a full reconstruction like Seventh Street, Prall said.

    This work is part of the 2017 ballot initiative that reallocated tax money to help improve Grand Junctions roads, Prall said. In 2017 the pavement condition index was at 69 out of 100, Prall said. The goal was to improve that to 73 by 2022. After last year the index was at 71, Prall said.

    Other road projects

    The city will be working on two other street projects this summer, Prall said.

    It is working to widen Horizon Place west of Seventh Street, including installing sidewalks to Juniper Ridge Community School. It is also planning to widen Monument Road near the Lunch Loop Trailhead.

    The widening of Monument Road will allow the city to add a second left-hand turning lane into the Lunch Loop parking lot. It will also add a 12-foot wide sidewalk to the south side of the road and increase the size of the parking lot to the west. Prall said the improvements will make the lot friendlier to larger vehicles like RVs and include space for venders.

    Say Trek Cycles or Specialized Cycles comes to town and they want to demo some stuff out there at the trail head, they can pull up there and take up spaces there as opposed to taking up seven or eight spaces in the regular parking lot, Prall said.

    That project will begin in July and conclude around Labor Day, Prall said.

    More:
    Grand Junction crews out chip sealing roads | Western Colorado - The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

    Guenter Pleased With Government’s Multi-Million Dollar Investment In Borderland – PembinaValleyOnline.com - June 11, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Borderland MLA Josh Guenter is welcoming a series of recent provincial funding announcements that will directly benefit the constituency.

    In just the last two weeks, the Progressive Conservative government unveiled planned investments exceeding $16.3 million for various projects and initiatives in Borderland.

    Guenter offers YFC - The Station's Sheridan Sawatzky and Marty Falk their Green Team funding for 2020.

    $12.9 million has been earmarked for three water-related projects under the government's Climate Resiliency and Damage Prevention Fund. The province will spend $7 million to upgrade St. Mary's Road in the R.M. of Montcalm, $2.9 million to expand storage capacity at the GNS East Pumping Station in the municipality of Rhineland and $2.2 million to remedy drainage issues in downtown Altona.

    "The beautiful thing about the way we are approaching this investment is that we the Province are taking one-hundred percent responsibility for funding these projects, meaning that municipal governments are able to re-purpose the money that they had dedicated towards these projects to other priorities," explained Guenter.

    Another $3.99 million will be spent on local infrastructure projects.

    Chip seal/graded aggregate chip seal work is planned for PTH 14 from east of PTH 32 to PR 306 and on PTH 23 in Morris from Leslie Street to PTH 59 at a cost of $1.49 million. An additional $2.5 million will go to rehabilitation work at various spots along PTH 75 from the U.S. border to PR 201 at Letellier.

    Guenter feels this funding is a validation of both municipal and provincial elected officials' efforts to work together for investment in Borderland communities, adding these are critical projects.

    "Our economy is growing, our local communities are growing and we need these important investment dollars to be there to ensure that our infrastructure continues to meet the needs of our communities going forward," he said.

    In addition, the Province is investing $186,808 in community development projects and organizations in Borderland through its Building Sustainable Communities program

    This includes:Dominion City Recreation Accessibility and Insulation Improvements ($75,000)Roseau Crossing Heritage Park Pool Liner Replacement ($56,864)Roseau River Park Inc. Washroom upgrades ($10,000)Rosenfeld Elementary School PAC Develop Natural Playground ($16,826)Emerson Cooperative Community Centre Inc. Equipment and Facility Improvements ($5,328)Municipality of Emerson-Franklin Emerson Park Outdoor Stage & Park Upgrades ($22,790)

    As well, another $$77,946 will go to supporting local youth employment via the Province's Green Team Funding program.

    This includes:Borderland School Division $7,927Gardens on Tenth $3,095Muse St-Joseph Museum $4,211Youth for Christ (Altona) $10,315Ridgeville Co-op Community Club $1,364Roseau Crossing Heritage Park and Pool $3,509Roseau River Bible Camp $20,630Roseau River Park $2,273Municipality of Rhineland $15,473Town of Altona $5,158Municipality of Emerson-Franklin $3,993

    "I think these investments prove positive that our government recognizes the importance of investing in southern Manitoba," said the Tory MLA. "Ours is a fast-growing, dynamic area that will continue to feature prominently in the province and we need those investment dollars to be there and that's what we're doing," added Guenter.

    Meantime, the Province announced another $13,750 in Manitoba Heritage Resource Conservation Grants for projects in Borderland.

    The list includes:Bergthaler Waisenamt (Altona) $4,150 to replace entry steps and railingEmerson Court House and Town Hall - $3750 to paint exterior trimHerdsman House - $5850 to restore interior partition, build/install wood gutters, restore windows

    View original post here:
    Guenter Pleased With Government's Multi-Million Dollar Investment In Borderland - PembinaValleyOnline.com

    Division Avenue and S. J St. intersection closes for utility work this week – soundtransit.org - May 24, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Crews will close S. J Street at Division Avenue to S. 3rd Street to install underground utilities this week. After Memorial Day, the contractor will move to N. J Street and install underground utilities in the N. J St. and Division Ave. intersection during weeknights from May 26 30, 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.

    In other areas, crews continue to install track on Martin Luther King Jr. Way from S. 11th St. to S. 10th St., as well as a sewer line on MLK Jr. Way from 6th Avenue to S. 8th St. On N. 1st St., crews continue to install track, the platform for the Stadium District Station, and curb, gutter and sidewalks. On Division Ave., crews are installing track from Yakima Ave. to I St. Commerce Street is closed in both directions between S. 7th St. and I-705 for utility work.

    Crews may work on Saturday morning, May 23, at Division and I Street, but otherwise will not work during the Memorial Day weekend. Looking ahead, the contractor plans to install track on the west side of Stadium Way near the I-705 ramp and install a water line on Pacific Avenue north of S. 7th St. after Memorial Day.

    COVID-19. The health and safety of all workers on Sound Transits construction sites are of utmost importance to us. Our contractors have primary responsibility for their wellbeing while working on our projects. Sound Transit is actively working with the contractors and construction management teams on all our projects to assure that public health guidelines are being followed.

    Construction and traffic restrictions on Commerce Street, Stadium Way, N. 1st Street, Yakima Avenue, Division Avenue, S. J Street, Martin Luther King Jr. Way, S. 7th Street, S. 10th Street, S. 11th Street, and S. 17th Street

    Week of May 18

    In addition, the contractor continues installing a sewer line on S. 10th St. and MLK Jr. Way. After completing work in this intersection, crews will install the sewer line on S. 10th St. on the west side of MLK Jr. Way to the alley.

    View post:
    Division Avenue and S. J St. intersection closes for utility work this week - soundtransit.org

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