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    The Towns Mirror Special: The school with the gazebo – Bangalore Mirror - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    By Sudeshna Dutta

    Dolores Arulappan runs a school, bakes, writes poems, embroiders and keeps a manicured garden. FYI shes just 83

    Residents of Pottery Town are quite familiar with Jack and Jill School, which was established in 1981. But for someone who sees the huge compound for the first time, it is a sight to behold. Starting with a friendly bark from Jackie at the gate, your eyes will immediately catch the pretty gazebo in front -- situated on one side of the garden full of plants -- with an artificial waterfall mesmerising you from the other end with the sound of ripples. In no way does it look like a normal school building, rather, the place sends the vibe of a warm, welcoming home. Indeed, it is also the home of Dolores Arulappan, the 83-year-old Principal and founder, who runs the school and teaches English to children while residing at its premises.

    In the initial days, there were just one or two classrooms where I would teach nursery and lower primary children. Over the years, we have grown into a full-fledged primary school till Class 4, with around 10 teaching staff. Children from different strata of the society, including the physically disabled ones, find this a safe haven to learn their lessons, she says.

    We were also going through financial troubles during that period, which is why I thought of doing something on my own and earning some money, she says. Arulappan is glad of her decision to open a school. Even now, my students and their parents come to me and say how grateful they are for giving them a strong foundation. Most of them who came from economically backward backgrounds are now doing well. This gives me immense satisfaction, she says.

    The premises of Jack and Jill School

    Most of them are about appreciation for life, death, children and nature, with underlying references to religion. I feel the world is turning harsh every day, so sitting here at the gazebo and jotting something down gives me temporary relief, she says, adding that most of her poems are included in the school text books for different classes. Some of them are converted into songs that are sung by the children at various school functions.

    Her skills also include embroidery, baking cakes and cookies and painting during her free time.

    During the course of conversation with Towns Mirror at the beautiful gazebo, Jackie, the Indie dog, came and jumped on his pet parents lap for his afternoon nap. We found him injured one day and rescued him from the streets. He has been my baby ever since, says Arulappan.

    Are you an East Bengaluru resident? Wed like to hear from you. email: anupama.bijur@timesgroup.com

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    The Towns Mirror Special: The school with the gazebo - Bangalore Mirror

    Future of gazebo on First Street Snohomish to be discussed – Snohomish County Tribune - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    By JAKE BERGPublished December 30, 2020Future of First Street Gazebo to be discussed

    Jake Berg photoA close-up photo of the First Street Gazebo stairs shows a glimpse of the wear sustained throughout the years.

    SNOHOMISH The future of the First Street Gazebo will be discussed during a January City Council meeting. The city will bring the topic to the City Council to gather feedback on how to best renovate the gazebo at Avenue A and First Street.The Gazebo needs a new roof, new stairs and many floorboards need to be replaced. The city is considering a renovation or a full demolition. City economic development manager Wendy Poischbeg said earlier this month that the No. 1 goal for the new gazebo is ADA accessibility.If a renovation would occur, the gazebo would be restored to its original glory. Poischbeg said demolition and rebuild would allow the city to explore other options for the location, for example, a small amphitheater for live entertainment or a pocket park.Poischbeg said that she has heard a lot of community members suggest the new gazebo be large enough to act as a stage for small concerts. She added that events on First Street such as Kla-Ha-Ya Days could benefit from the addition of some sort of stage in the historic downtown.The gazebo was built in the 1980s and is renowned by many throughout the town of Snohomish as a location for photoshoots and even marriage proposals. But wear has taken its toll over 30-plus years, which has caused the city to take notice and take action toward the repair.Earlier in 2020, Snohomish was a finalist in a small-town America contest and was planning on using the prize money for the renovation. After further evaluation, the cost would exceed the $25,000 prize and repairs would be more costly than expected. After Snohomish came up short in the contest, it was apparent the city would have to seek funds to fix the gazebo.

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    Future of gazebo on First Street Snohomish to be discussed - Snohomish County Tribune

    UK NEWS: The moment prankster dad’s joke in the snow seriously backfires – The Westmorland Gazette - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    THIS is the moment a dad tried to cover his kids in snow from the top of his gazebo - only for it to completely collapse on top of him.

    Daniel Campbell, 34, tried to scrape off a bit of snow that had settled on the roof of the structure onto his kids Kacey, 15, Finley, 10, and Nate, seven, while wife Lucy, 34, filmed.

    But after failing to give them the shower he desired, his plan backfired and the gazebo collapsed on his head, leaving the whole family in hysterics.

    The mum-of-three, who owns a cafe, said: "We knew there would be fresh snow as the caf had been locked up, and my husband told me to start filming because he wanted to bash all the snow off the gazebo onto the kids!

    "He was trying to prank the kids but it obviously backfired!

    "I stopped laughing for a bit because I didn't know if he was ok, but when he crawled out from under the gazebo I carried on!"

    The gazebo in Wolverhampton was used to shelter customers whilst they wait for their takeaway orders, but sadly did not survive the hijinks by construction company owner Daniel.

    Lucy said: "We have to go and buy an emergency one tomorrow before the caf opens up!"

    The Black Country saw two inches of snow overnight on December 27 and the clip was filmed the next day.

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    UK NEWS: The moment prankster dad's joke in the snow seriously backfires - The Westmorland Gazette

    Dad tries to cover kids in snow from top of gazebo – but prank backfires massively – Birmingham Live - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    This is the moment a dad tried to cover his kids in snow from the top of his gazebo - only for it to completely collapse on top of him.

    Daniel Campbell, 34, tried to scrape off a bit of snow that had settled on the roof of the structure onto his kids Kacey, 15, Finley, 10, and Nate, seven, while wife Lucy, 34, filmed.

    But after failing to give them the shower he desired, his plan backfired and the gazebo collapsed on his head, leaving the whole family in hysterics.

    The mum-of-three, who owns a cafe, said: "We knew there would be fresh snow as the caf had been locked up, and my husband told me to start filming because he wanted to bash all the snow off the gazebo onto the kids!

    "He was trying to prank the kids but it obviously backfired!

    "I stopped laughing for a bit because I didn't know if he was ok, but when he crawled out from under the gazebo I carried on!"

    The gazebo in Wolverhampton was used to shelter customers whilst they wait for their takeaway orders, but sadly did not survive the hijinks by construction company owner Daniel.

    Lucy said: "We have to go and buy an emergency one tomorrow before the caf opens up!"

    The Black Country saw two inches of snow overnight on December 27 and the clip was filmed the next day.

    More here:
    Dad tries to cover kids in snow from top of gazebo - but prank backfires massively - Birmingham Live

    ‘Fortnite’ Gnome Locations to Dig Up, Bury and Collect at Holly Hedges and More – Newsweek - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Fortnite Week 5 Challenges focus on digging up, collecting and burying Gnomes at specific locations on the Battle Royale map. In this all-encompassing guide, we'll show you where you need to go to locate Gnomes and Gnome placement spots in Fort Crumpet, Pleasant Park, Holly Hedges and Retail Row. There's a lot to dig into, so let's get to it.

    While hardcore Fortnite fans may know the location of Fort Crumpet, it's not officially named on the Battle Royale map. As you can see on the map below, however, it's located in a clearing southwest of Coral Castle. The first location to dig up Gnomes is marked.

    Go through the main entrance, take a right by the concession stand and you'll see the Gnome sticking out of the ground near the stairs. Hit the spot with your Pickaxe to dig up the Gnome.

    For the second spot at Fort Crumpet, pass by the stairs and take a left under the wooden structure. You'll see a bench. Right next to that bench is another spot to dig with your Pickaxe.

    It's a similar affair over in Pleasant Park. The first dig spot is towards the northeast corner of the PoI.

    Look for this tree in a clearing, directly in front of the blue house and stone house shown here.

    The second spot to dig up is behind the stone house, so just head straight for it. To complete the challenge you need to dig up both Gnomes in their respective locations, so pick the one you like best.

    For the Gnome burying challenge the concept is basically the same, only you need to approach the dirt mound and interact with it to "bury Gnome." The first location you can do this is in the center of the location, as marked on the map below.

    It's at this bench right near the soccer net. You won't see the mound in my picture because this guide was made in the Battle Lab.

    For the second Gnome burying spot, pass through the gazebo and head for the stone house you see straight ahead. There's a mound near the tree out front.

    When it comes to burying Gnomes in Retail Row, start by going to this spot in the western part of the location.

    You'll see a yellow house. On the corner of the fence is this unique plant with a burial spot nearby.

    The second Gnome burying spot at Retail is in the northwest corner.

    Go to the blue house. Right near the candy cane decorations out front is another location to bury a Gnome. To complete the challenge bury both Gnomes at one of these places.

    For this third and final Gnome challenge for Week 5, all you have to do is collect the Gnomes standing in the spots we describe. With that in mind, go back to the main entrance of Fort Crumpet where you may have been before.

    Behind the counter of the concession stand right as you enter is the first Gnome.

    From there, go under the stone arch doorway to your left, take another left and you'll come to this wooden staircase. There's a Gnome standing underneath. Just press the designated button to collect it.

    At Holly Hedges you can collect your first Gnome towards the northern part of the location.

    You'll see it right as you pass under the arch with the big Christmas tree.

    The second Holly Hedges Gnome is to the south.

    Head to the back of the garden store, and you'll find it hiding between some potted plants. That's all you need to know about digging up, burying and collecting Gnomes for Fortnite's Week 5 Challenges.

    That being said, digging up, burying and collecting Gnomes accounts for just three of the Week 5 Challenges that made their debut in Fortnite on Thursday. If you're looking for even more XP for your Battle Pass, there are at least five more tasks you can complete to get a maximum return for your efforts. Here's the full list of objectives as seen in-game.

    That's all there is to know about Week 5 in Fortnite.

    Fortnite is available now on PS5, PS4, Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One, Switch, PC and Android.

    Were you able to complete all of the Gnome challenges for Fortnite Week 5? Which challenge did you find most difficult? Tell us in the comments section!

    See more here:
    'Fortnite' Gnome Locations to Dig Up, Bury and Collect at Holly Hedges and More - Newsweek

    State helping non-profit art organizations impacted by the pandemic – ABC17News.com - January 3, 2021 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Click here for updates on this story

    NORWCIH, Connecticut (WFSB) The pandemic decimated the arts community along with restaurants and establishments.

    Now, the State of Connecticut is coming to the aid of many of the non-profit arts organizations in Norwich and New London to keep them afloat.

    Several Norwich area art organizations have been using the gazebo in Brown Park for some social distanced performances to keep the arts alive.

    To help keep them alive financially, the state is doling out $9 million to 154 organizations.

    New Londons Garde Arts Center received $182,000 in state funding, Eastern Connecticut Symphony got more than $56,000, and ArtReach in Norwich received $94,000.

    Lt. Governor Susan Bysiewicz says the funding goes a long way to supporting the arts and the downtown businesses who benefit and thrive because of them.

    A scaled down Garde Arts Theater Center survived thanks to the ingenuity of New London Public Schools by partnering with them.

    We are host for learning pods for the New London Schools. We have the Isaac School, the Charter Arts Schools, a neighbor of ours is using spaces we have in our storefronts, said Steve Sigel, Executive Director of Garde Arts Center.

    Sigel hopes his venue at the Garde can state scheduling programming next summer or fall.

    Please note: This content carries a strict local market embargo. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you may not use it on any platform.

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    State helping non-profit art organizations impacted by the pandemic - ABC17News.com

    Gazebo access a sticking point with Lancaster selectman who would rather raze it than wait – Worcester Telegram - December 10, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Sara Arnold| Item Correspondent

    LANCASTER - Selectman Jason Allison is furious the gazebo is not yet ADA accessible and is prepared to have the gazebo removed if that is not rectified.

    During Monday night's meeting, he said it is critical the town serves the 10 percent of the population that has ambulatory disabilities, adding we care more about where it is, than if its accessible.

    Town Administrator Orlando Pacheco said there were plans in place to build after winter, creating a ramp, with an informal April or May deadline. The new ramp would be smaller and look more like the gazebo, with a stone dust pathway.

    Im not OK with this, Allison said, adding that if the gazebo wasnt made accessible by March 1, he wanted it removed.

    Selectmen Jay Moody and Walter Sendrowski were concerned, given the wintry weather that is likely between now and March.

    Allison said he is very upset, and passionate about the 'who' not the 'where,'a problem which he is motivated to solve.

    Moody suggested a compromise,havingfinal plans done by March 1.

    Allison made a motion for formal final plans to be completed and approved by the Commission on Disability and the building commissioner by March 1; if not, the gazebo must be taken down.

    Were not in a position to threaten anybody, Sendrowski said, recommending they wait until spring and get the plans in place. He called the threat of removal overkill.

    Selectmen unanimously approved a motion to draw up plans, with the requirement that the gazebo be removed taken off the table.

    Allison said he would make a motion at the March 1 selectmens meeting for the gazebo to be removed if the final plans werent completed.

    There will be no more signs on the Town Green - kind of.

    The Town Green Committee had previously unanimously recommended signs be banned.

    Allison said he was torn, as signs like the banners found on the Town Green are important in moderation.

    Sendrowski refused to weigh in on the issue at all.

    Consider me a dissenter, he said, pointing out he was not in favor of the committee being brought into existence in the first place.

    Although Thayer Memorial Library has historically placed banners there, such as for the annual book sale, Director Joe Mul said the Town Green is a revered space and he said he supports no allowing signs.

    The signs of the Bulfinch church would be exempt, so banners for the annual strawberry festival and other events of the church would continue to be on the Town Green.

    Pacheco said the bylaw referenced during discussion addresses only permanent signage, not the kind of temporary banners that have been placed on the Town Green. He said a change would impact five to 10 banners a year.

    Banners are subject to the elements, fall overand look really bad, said Heather Lennon, a member of the Town Green Committee and chairman of the Historical Commission. The seat of town government needs to be pristine.

    Banning signs passed 2-0, with Sendrowski abstaining.

    Making the committee permanent, the committees other recommendation, was not taken up.

    Special Town Meeting might still need to happen.

    Although Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical High Schools School Committee planned this week to discuss Lancasters request for them to revote on athletic fields borrowing in spring, to allow Lancaster not to try to bring residents to a town meeting during the winter (see the story in the Dec. 4 Item), Pacheco believes the answer will be no.

    He said he was told the low bid Minuteman is planning to accept is only valid until mid-January, and other member towns arent doing a town meeting to vote on the borrowing.

    If Lancaster wants to stop the district from taking out the loan, the town will likely need to have a special town meeting within 60 days of the Minuteman vote.

    Moody asked residents to write to the selectmen or Pacheco if they do or dont want a town meeting and the Minuteman borrowing, so selectmen can decide at the Dec. 21 meeting if they need to resurrect the special town meeting.

    If they do have one, they can now do so on a Saturday, as that bylaw has been changed.

    There will be a permanent committee for commercial and industrial economic development.

    Phil Eugene, a member of the temporary committee, said a permanent committee will be tasked with reviewing development proposals to keep Lancasters character and rural charm and prevent overdevelopmentwhile encouraging development in North Lancaster, including infrastructure like water and sewer.

    This is what the town needs, Allison said. This could be pivotal to take Lancaster where it needs to be.

    Sedrowski said they need to have friendly, cooperative conversations with developers, not like what has happened in the past. He said they needed to concentrate on and emphasize getting development happening in North Lancaster, not keeping the town pure.

    We need money, Sendrowski said. They all agreed.

    The committee will consist of seven members, including members from the Planning Board, Conservation Commissionand the town planner. The three spots for residents will be immediately advertised.

    Selectmen followed the Board of Assessors recommendation and set a single tax rate for both residential and commercial property.

    Selectmen declined to renew Kalon Farms alcohol license for wine and beer. Kalon Farms has been cited for serious safety violations and code issues, with the state building department now involved as well as action from the state on pouring licensing issues and land use decisions, according to Pacheco.

    Some operations will have to cease permanently and some will have to operate differently, he said.

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    Gazebo access a sticking point with Lancaster selectman who would rather raze it than wait - Worcester Telegram

    The pandemic helped make FDR Park better. Now it has to survive the aftermath – WHYY - December 10, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    If you live in South Philly, its not your imagination: Franklin Delano Roosevelt Park is having a moment.

    As COVID-19 restrictions pushed more residents outdoors, many urban parks saw attendance surge and city officials say FDR hit unprecedented levels of use. They estimate that park trash collection, one rough measure of usage, increased by 50% since last year in a park that already saw hundreds of thousands of annual visitors by some estimates. More than 900 on-site parking spaces are now regularly maxed out on weekends, and new park volunteers have arrived by the dozens.

    But volunteer Carolina Torres Toledo, a volunteer park ambassador, said the surge is also the fruit of a battery of deliberate and often community-driven improvements aimed at making the park more user-friendly. Most visibly, park staff and volunteers transformed a defunct 146-acre golf course into an informal network of public trails, effectively doubling the publicly accessible grounds at FDR, reigniting interest in the park along the way.

    In the last year theres been way more volunteers, Toledo said. Especially since some of the new trails have been openedIts appealing because many people have never been there before.

    Changes at the park like this and numerous smaller improvements arent coincidental. They emerged from an experiment that could revolutionize how Philadelphia manages its showpiece parks. But they also come just as the citys looming fiscal crisis threatens those same improvements and economic strains from the pandemic stall philanthropic donations Philadelphia increasingly depends on for major public works projects.

    An ambitious $250 million 10-year master plan for FDR that was unveiled last year as a joint project of Parks & Recreation, the nonprofit Fairmount Park Conservancy and the William Penn Foundation has already had its lengthy timeline upended.

    Were always afraid, said Andy Toy, a board member at the Friends of FDR Park, a neighborhood-driven nonprofit support organization, of funding cuts. And I honestly dont know what [philanthropic groups] will support right now. The master plan might have to get broken into more, smaller pieces.

    The sprawling tract near the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, was originally known as League Island Park and was pieced together in phases during the early to mid-20th century. Initially designed by the same Olmsted Brothers, whose fathers firm also planned Central Park, the green respite was envisioned by city leaders as a means of managing the collision between South Phillys cramped, unplanned rowhouse blocks and what was essentially estuarial bogland at the time. The solution was a landscaped park, which would be further developed during the citys ill-fated 1926 Sesquicentennial Exhibition with a planned golf course added later, reportedly at the urging of officers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.

    At 348 acres, FDR is larger than both the Packer Park neighborhood it borders across Pattison Avenue to the north and the sprawling Sports Complex to the east that houses the citys pro teams. In addition to open space, the park is also home to institutions like the American Swedish Historical Museum, ancient structures like the colonial-era Samuel Preston House, Audubon Society-designated bird-watching areas, a skate park and numerous athletic areas.

    This current master plan came after a lengthy community engagement process that identified assets and big challenges in the largest green space in South Philadelphia, a dense neighborhood that is changing as new immigrants and young families flock to affordable rowhouses. Many residents both praised the park and identified it as severely neglected.

    People pointed to athletic areas that felt neglected. They noted the potholes and pockmarks on the central loop road the result of subsidence and deferred maintenance. More than half the park was still dedicated to the 1940s-era golf course, which closed in 2019 due to a lack of use and chronic flooding. Although the park is known for its Olmsted-designed boathouse and gazebo around a central lake, an entire secondary swimming pond known as Meadow Lake and two adjacent bathhouses sit largely disused and nearly invisible from some of the primary park trails due to overgrowth.

    In neglect came some opportunities. Liminal space underneath Interstate 95 to the south has long been used as a DIY skatepark an internationally-recognized and ever-changing graffiti-covered course of concrete halfpipes, hips, and bowls that are largely maintained by the skaters that use it. South Phillys Southeast Asian and Latin American communities regularly transform other parts of the park into informal food markets on weekends.

    But it was clear there had been little central guidance or support. As many opportunities as the park had captured, it had missed.

    For example, Toledo, who aided in the community outreach process, said they also help coordinate games with a popular local Latin American soccer league but the park wasnt designed with a formal soccer area in mind. The growing league has, for years, squeezed into a patchy section of unused lawn adopted by hundreds of South Philly footballers who couldnt find better facilities.

    Its crazy that just across the street are multi-million dollar stadiums, they said.

    I think FDR was forgotten about. And whats happened is people themselves have had to make up for the lack of care from the city, Toledo said. Its a really multicultural place. But its also a place that a lot of people dont knowtheres a need to be more user friendly. It needs more bilingual support.

    The month the pandemic struck in earnest, the city took one of its first steps toward reimagining the park, installing Justin DiBerardinis as a full-time executive director at FDR, a first-of-its-kind position that would oversee operations, programming and the eventual implementation of the master plan. This move brought FDR more in line with intensive park management strategies employed in places like Brooklyns Prospect Park, where a municipal park administrator is paired with dedicated staff and a robust friends group to help keep up with day-to-day needs at the park.

    Prior to the launch of the master plan, FDR was unstaffed, mostly passive parkland, said Parks & Rec spokesperson Maita Soukup.

    Soukup said the city had also made other real investments: Hiring two more support staffers in the interim and pouring money into tangible renovation projects. $750,000 went to repaving the pockmarked loop road and parking lots, striping a new bike lane in the process. The department poured a million dollars into a new roof for the historic FDR Park Welcome Center, a former stables for police mounted units. Eventually, the building is envisioned as an environmental center and offices for staffers.

    A $250,000 state planning grant, that will be matched by the Fairmount Park Conservancy, will begin the process of designing a new playground area. New trails and remediation for 40 acres of mostly inaccessible wetland near the back nine of the golf course are slated to begin, with investment from the Philadelphia International Airport, possibly as soon as next fall.

    Other investments have come from the parks growing community of superfans. In 2020, nearly a year after the golf course closed for good, park staff teamed up with volunteers to reopen the former grounds as a hiking and recreation meadow. Handpainted signs inform visitors the area is now dubbed The South Philly Meadows and the space has been key to handling the surge in visitors during the COVID era, Toy said.

    I personally didnt even know about the golf course. Id never used it, he explained. I didnt realize how large it was.

    View original post here:
    The pandemic helped make FDR Park better. Now it has to survive the aftermath - WHYY

    Child killed in hit and run; suspect still at large – The Augusta Chronicle - December 10, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    By Michael DeWitt and Mae Frances Bing| Augusta Chronicle

    A 4-year-old child and his dog were killed during a hit-and-run incident, and another person was injured, leaving family, police and the community searching for answers and justice.

    Hampton County EMS, first responders and law enforcement responded to a report of a vehicle versus pedestrian accident around 5:46 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 5, at 348 Palmetto Avenue, Varnville, near the Varnville Gazebo.

    Responders found that a four-year-old, JaKarie Breland, of 65 Middle Street, Varnville, was riding his bicycle with his dog and his uncle, Delante Chisolm, 44, when all three were struck by a vehicle that had reportedly left the scene after impact.

    According to EMS and Varnville Police Department reports, Hampton County Emergency Management Division Director Susanne Peeples happened to be in the area with her grandchildren to enjoy the Christmas light display at the Varnville Gazebo and was the first on the scene. Peeples started CPR on Breland until EMS units arrived.

    Breland was then transported to Hampton Regional Medical Center before being flown by helicopter to the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, where he died around 2 a.m. Sunday, said Hampton County Coroner Angela Topper.

    Chisolm was transported to HRMC and treated for minor injuries. The boys dog, Sugar, died at the scene.

    As of press time on Wednesday, no driver has come forward to take responsibility and no suspects have been charged. The hit and run incident remains under investigation by the Varnville Police Department, with assistance from other law enforcement agencies and the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED).

    We want justice for JaKarie and his uncle, and we want his mother to have clarity and get some answers, said Varnville Police Chief Tyrone Smith.

    Smith said that police are searching for a dark-in-color car, possibly a sedan, with possible damage down low or underneath the vehicle.

    I believe the driver panicked, or maybe was intoxicated or driving under suspension, but that doesnt give them the right to not stop and render aid for this boy.

    Smith thanks the Hampton Police Department and the Hampton County Sheriffs Office for their assistance in this ongoing investigation, and praised the response by EMD Director Peeples, who initially brought Breland back from an unresponsive state, according to reports.

    I commend Mrs. Susanne for the great work she did to render CPR and aid to JaKarie and his family, said Smith. She did a great job, and I am so proud to say that I work with her. Im so grateful for her, and Hampton County should be proud to have her. But the focus isnt on us, its about finding justice for JaKarie, and thats what we are going to do.

    The VPD and assisting agencies is out and about in the community conducting the investigation, and are speaking to area residents and local auto body shop businesses. Police are encouraging residents and businesses to report any type of damages that are found, and reports can be made anonymously by calling the VPD at 803-943-2979, or the Hampton County 911 Dispatch at 803-943-9261, or by calling any local police department or authority that you feel comfortable speaking with.

    An angel taken too soon

    The Hampton County Guardian correspondent Mae Frances Bing spoke with Brelands sister, Diamond Hamilton, to learn more about this young man whose life was taken too soon. Hamilton described Breland as a smart, very curious, caring and loving boy who loved pizza, pancakes and French fries.

    He loved to go outside, play with his toys, watch things on his tablet, and he loved to learn, ride his bike and paint, said Hamilton. His favorite cartoons were Peppa Pig and he loved Super Ranger Mini Force. His favorite cartoon characters were Marshall and Chase from Paw Patrol.

    Breland also loved his dog and enjoyed walking him often, with the help of his family members.

    Breland is the son of Aketa Davis, of Varnville, and Dyshawn Breland. He also leaves behind a nephew, Cannon Risher, and a baby brother.

    Originally posted here:
    Child killed in hit and run; suspect still at large - The Augusta Chronicle

    Pantomime Characters to Deliver Holiday Cheer to Homes in Bilston and Wolverhampton – Broadway World - December 10, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    For many towns and cities, the magic of pantomime won't be part of families' festive plans this Christmas. For the residents of Bilston and across areas of Wolverhampton, Bilston based charity Gazebo Theatre are taking their pantomime Dame and Fairy to the streets to spread joy to the community, visiting the homes of those who may be feeling lonely, isolated, overwhelmed, facing difficulties financially, or just in need of a pick me up - to know there are people there who care.

    Dennis Ffrench, the UK's longest-serving black Pantomime Dame and Rebecca Shepherd will lead the team from Gazebo to deliver well-being packs throughout the week beginning 14th December.

    The packs contain a range of items including handmade bath bombs, soap, crafty wellbeing activities, a keepsake keyring, toys and recipes as well as reusable bags and facemasks. Contents have been sourced and bought from local small businesses and artists, with the support of Simple Acts of Kindness, who have also taken donations of new toys; as well as from organisations; Wolverhampton Sewing Group, the Hope Centre, City of Sanctuary, and the Refugee and Migrant Centre, who have been raising funds through sales of their cookbooks. Gazebo have been supported by their team of HeadStart parent and carer volunteers to compile the packs, and help identify local families and individuals who would benefit from one of the packs.

    The packs are part of Gazebo's Mindful Support project, which is funded until February 2021 by the Government's Emergency COVID-19 Fund, distributed through the National Lottery Community Fund. The project will also provide people in the local community with free telephone, video call and text counselling, advice and guidance throughout January and February as well as providing those who find themselves digitally excluded with tablets and up to 6 months of internet access. This is in addition to befriending services and support for families.

    If you know someone who would benefit from support this Christmas, you should contact Gazebo's Mindful Support Team by calling 07393 018 271 or email mindfulsupport@gazebotheatre.com.

    In 2019, Gazebo spread the festive cheer with a Christmas single, Christmas Is A Time of Cheer, written and produced by Gazebo Studios manager, Danny Hudson. It features staff and service users of Gazebo and has been re-released this year in the hope of spreading a little joy at the end of 2020.

    Check out the video below!

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    Pantomime Characters to Deliver Holiday Cheer to Homes in Bilston and Wolverhampton - Broadway World

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