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    Millions of pounds of investment in Island schools – Isle of Wight Observer - March 3, 2020 by admin

    Six Island schools were upgraded or refurbished by the Isle of Wight Council last year and many more are set to benefit from millions of pounds of government funding.

    In total, almost 2 million was invested by the council in major projects that have included modern classrooms, replacement roofing and windows, heating systems and electrical works.

    However, a further estimated 12 million is set to be spent on the Island over the coming years through the governments Priority Schools Building Programme (PSBP).

    The programme has already seen the refurbishment of Barton Primary School, Newport, and a new build at Queensgate Primary School, East Cowes which opened last week with major works also planned for Binstead, Brading, Dover Park (Ryde), Greenmount (Ryde), Wootton and Wroxall primary schools.

    Councillor Paul Brading, Cabinet member for childrens services and education, said: We are continually investing in our schools to ensure our children have the best possible learning environment.

    Thanks to the strong working relationship between the Department for Education (DfE) and local authority, many Island schools are also benefiting from significant investment from the governments PSBP.

    Our push on improvements is helping to boost school results on the Island with outcomes improving at a much faster rate than schools nationally.

    Godshill Primary School has recently undergone a 640,000 transformation with the council investing a further 790,000 in Cowes and Broadlea primary schools, with the latter benefiting from a brand-new roof.

    Around 200,000 has been spent at The Bay Church of England School, Sandown, as part of a series of works which has included the refurbishment of the school dining hall.

    Meanwhile, further investment has been made at St Georges special school and Medina House School, both at Newport, to enhance fire safety.

    Among the schools to have already benefited from PSBP funding is Gurnard Primary where, last month, pupils were excited to walk into a snazzy new building.

    The old school had become very expensive and time consuming to maintain with a leaky roof, blocked drains and temperamental boiler.

    The new building has much larger classrooms, benefits from the latest facilities and is fully accessible for children and adults with disabilities.

    Headteacher Vanessa Hicks said: We are lucky enough to have two halls, two library spaces, music practice rooms and a specialist science lab.

    The learning environment in the new school is outstanding.

    The children are now designing our new back garden which will be created on the site of the old school. This will include a natural playground, pond, wildflower meadow, forest school, orchard and allotment so were all very excited to see it develop.

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    Millions of pounds of investment in Island schools - Isle of Wight Observer

    Cumberland news – News – The Daily Jeffersonian - March 3, 2020 by admin

    By John E. LePage Jr.Correspondent

    SundayMar1,2020at12:01AM

    The Spencer Township Trustees met on Feb. 17. Trustees Brad West and Mark Roberts were present along with Fiscal Officer Darlene Miser.

    Bills in the amount of $25,158.92 were presented and approved for payment. Correspondence received included GrassRoots Clippings Newsletter, legislative alerts, and miscellaneous mailings. There were no visitors in attendance.

    In old business the trustees discussed the Windstream road bore, Internet connection and the Muskingum Watershed assessment. In new business, the trustees discussed roofing proposals and the possible replacement of a tractor utilizing the state bidding program.

    The next regular meeting of the Spencer Township Trustees will be on Monday March 16 at 7 p.m. in the Township Building on Mill Street in Cumberland.

    Upcoming events

    The next card making class at the Presbyterian Church in Cumberland will be March 2. It will run from 1 to 3 p.m. No skills or materials are needed. The cost is a $10 donation to the church.

    March 2 The next regular meeting of the Cumberland Village Council is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. in the village building on Mill Street.

    March 3-4 The SouthEastern Ohio Joint Solid Waste Management Districts Recycling Trailer is scheduled to be at the Spencer Township Building on Mill Street in Cumberland. Please do not place trash in the trailer or leave items on the ground next to the trailer. The recycling trailers schedule is subject to change.

    Wednesdays There is a quilting group get together beginning at 9:30 am at the Presbyterian Church in Cumberland located at the intersection of Main and Church streets.

    Thursdays Euchre is scheduled at the Chandlersville Community Building from 7 to 9 p.m., weather permitting. (The Community Building is the old Chandlersville School located on SR 146 in Chandlersville.)

    Read more here:
    Cumberland news - News - The Daily Jeffersonian

    Michigan March 10th Election: What’s On the Ballot and How to Vote In Metro Detroit – WDET - March 3, 2020 by admin

    On Tuesday, March 10th, Michiganders will head to the polls to vote on the Republican and Democratic Presidential nominees. When they get there, theyll see a number of proposals on the ballot aswell.

    See key information on voting below, including proposals that 101.9 WDETs newsroom is currently reporting. This article will be updated as we publishreporting.

    Voters will need to choose from three ballot types. They can pick a Democratic,Republican,or non-presidentialballot.

    A non-presidential ballot is for voters who choose to give up voting for presidential candidates in the primary in order to keep their party affiliations private. Ballot choices are subject to the Freedom of Information Act for 22 months after an election. They will still be able to vote on localproposals.

    Here are the ballot initiatives and proposals 101.9 WDETs reporters will be following in advance of the election. This list is not comprehensive, but a reflection of our newsroomreporting.

    What: Wayne, Macomb and Oakland counties will be asked if they want to renew a millage for the Detroit Institute of Arts. The ten year,.2 mill tax was initially passed in 2012. It costs a tax payer with a $100,000 home $10peryear.

    Supporters: Salvador Salort-Pons,Director of the DIA,says the millage has allowed the museum to bus in seniors and studentsand fund community arts programming in thecounties.

    In the past we were an organization that generally speaking was looking a little bit inwards. Thanks to this millage and the service agreement we have with Oakland, Wayne and Macomb counties we areout-facing.

    Opponents: During the 2012 campaign the DIA said it would not ask for a renewal. Critics say its unfair the museum put the millage on the ballot during a primary election,which historically has low voterturnout.

    A lawmaker has introduced a bill that would allow communities to opt out of the Detroit Institute of Arts millage renewal, should it pass. State House Rep. Jeff Yaroch represents northern Macomb County communities like Armada, Richmond and Memphis.He says he introduced the bill because most of his communities voted against the millage in2012.

    We have our own issues to take care of. We have water, sewerage and roads issues. So maybe some of those communities would rather see their resources go to fixing their own issues than addressing another countysissues.

    What:Ferndale Public Schools has a proposal to raise$120 million over 10 years through a bond on the ballot. The bond is structured to avoid a tax increase for Ferndaleresidents.

    Supporters:Superintendent Dania Bazzi says the bond is needed to make improvements to the Ferndale High School and Middle Schoolcampus.

    That campus the building was built in the 1950s. It is a solid building. But much like your home, its in need of mechanical, plumbingand roofing upgrades, which are substantial on a 420,000 square footbuilding.

    What:The proposal would create a policy for the implementation of marijuana facilities, including process, fees and criteria for licensing. The proposal would prohibit sales or marijuana within 1,000 feet of schools, include equity plans for communities impacted by the prohibition of marijuana, and implement a businessexcisetax.

    What: Proposal to allow Plymouth-Canton Community Schools to borrow up to $275,000,000 through the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of upgrading school facilities, construction of a new stadium, acquiring instructional technology, and preparing new activity and athletic facilities. Repayment of the bonds is expected to incur an average of 1.65 mills annually for up to 20 years, costing a tax payer with a $100,000 home $165 ayear.

    What: Proposal to increase a millage on taxable property by 1.9 mills over 10 years, 2020 to 2029, for enhancements to local public school districts. The millage would raise an estimated $55 million if approved, and costa tax payer with a $100,000 home $95 peryear.

    Schools that would benefit from the millage include Anchor Bay School District, Armada Area Schools, Center Line Public Schools, Chippewa Valley Schools, Clintondale Community Schools, Eastpointe Public Schools, Fitzgerald Public Schools, Fraser Public Schools, Lake Shore Public Schools, Lakeview Public Schools, LAnse Creuse Public Schools, Mount Clemens Community Schools, New Haven Community Schools, Richmond Community Schools, Romeo Community Schools, Roseville Community Schools, South Lake Schools, South Lake Schools, Utica Community Schools, Van Dyke Public Schools, Warren Consolidated Schools, Warren Woods Public Schools and Macomb Intermediate SchoolDistrict.

    What:A proposal to allow Birmingham Public Schools to borrow up to $195,000,000 through the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of upgrading school facilities, construction of a new stadium, acquiring instructional technology, and preparing new activity and athletic facilities. Repayment of the bonds is expected to incur an average of1.24 mills annually for up to 20 years, costing a tax payer with a $100,000 home $124 ayear.

    What:Proposal to extenda millage on taxable property for up to 18 mills for general school operating purposes, restricted to 16.9698 mills on owner-occupied homes, for 10 years, 2020 to 2029. This millage would raise approximately $42,309,000 in the firstyear.

    What:Proposal to allow the city to continue to levy a 7.5 mils property tax in Center Line for 10 years, 2021 through 2030, for public safety, police and fire.Based on current taxable property value the millage would raise approximately $1,160,000 and cost an owner of a $100,000 property $750 ayear.

    Read more from the original source:
    Michigan March 10th Election: What's On the Ballot and How to Vote In Metro Detroit - WDET

    School’s cool! Gurnard pupils return to a shiny new building after half term – Isle of Wight County Press - March 3, 2020 by admin

    PUPILS at Gurnard Primary School have returned to a shiny new school after the half-term holiday.

    The old school had become very expensive and time consuming to maintain, with a leaky roof, blocked drains and temperamental boiler.

    The new building has larger classrooms, benefits from the latest facilities and is fully accessible for children and adults with disabilities.

    Headteacher Vanessa Hicks said: "We are lucky enough to have two halls, two library spaces, music practice rooms and a specialist science lab.

    "The learning environment in the new school is outstanding.

    "The children are now designing our new back garden which will be created on the site of the old school (formerly Solent Middle School).

    "This will include a natural playground, pond, wildflower meadow, forest school, orchard and allotment so were all very excited to see it develop."

    According to the Isle of Wight Council, it upgraded or refurbished six schools last year and many more are set to benefit from millions of pounds of government funding.

    In total, almost 2 million was invested by the council in major projects that have included modern classrooms, replacement roofing and windows, heating systems and electrical works.

    However, a further estimated 12 million is set to be spent on the Island over the coming years through the government's Priority Schools Building Programme (PSBP).

    The programme has already seen the refurbishment of Barton Primary School, Newport, and a new build at Queensgate Primary School, East Cowes which opened last week with major works also planned for Binstead, Brading, Dover Park (Ryde), Greenmount (Ryde), Wootton and Wroxall primary schools.

    Cllr Paul Brading, Cabinet member for children's services and education, said: "We are continually investing in our schools to ensure our children have the best possible learning environment.

    "Thanks to the strong working relationship between the Department for Education (DfE) and local authority, many Island schools are also benefitting from significant investment from the government's PSBP.

    "Our push on improvements is helping to boost school results on the Island with outcomes improving at a much faster rate than schools nationally."

    Godshill Primary School has recently undergone a 640,000 transformation with the council investing a further 790,000 in Cowes and Broadlea primary schools, with the latter benefitting from a brand-new roof.

    Around 200,000 has been spent at The Bay Church of England School, Sandown, as part of a series of works which has included the refurbishment of the school dining hall.

    Meanwhile, further investment has been made at St George's special school and Medina House School, both at Newport, to enhance fire safety.

    View original post here:
    School's cool! Gurnard pupils return to a shiny new building after half term - Isle of Wight County Press

    Amstill Roofing commits to roof repairs for HomeAid nonprofits – Chron.com - February 23, 2020 by admin

    Published 11:00pm CST, Saturday, February 22, 2020

    The entire crew at Amstill Roofing commits to supporting HomeAid and their non-profit homeless care agencies who need roof repairs at no cost to the charites.

    The entire crew at Amstill Roofing commits to supporting HomeAid and their non-profit homeless care agencies who need roof repairs at no cost to the charites.

    The entire crew at Amstill Roofing commits to supporting HomeAid and their non-profit homeless care agencies who need roof repairs at no cost to the charites.

    The entire crew at Amstill Roofing commits to supporting HomeAid and their non-profit homeless care agencies who need roof repairs at no cost to the charites.

    Amstill Roofing commits to roof repairs for HomeAid nonprofits

    Amstill Roofing, a family owned residential re-roofing and roof repair company has committed their services to HomeAid Houston. Amstill has offered to replace up to five roofs for HomeAids homeless care agencies within their service area. These agencies experience damage and wear and tear just like residential homeowners. The agencies can call Amstill at any time to perform a weather integrity evaluation of the roof. If the roof was damaged by natural means, they will assist the non-profit in filing a claim. Amstill will provide all the resources necessary to make sure that the property can be restored correctly. If the roof has met the end of its life cycle, Amstill will replace up to two of these a year at no cost.

    Sam Stilley, the companys second generation owner has taken a personal interest to make sure that HomeAid and our agency partners are not burdened with costly repairs and replacement costs to restore these properties correctly when the time comes, said Jim Muska, president of HomeAid Houston. HomeAid and our agencies are grateful for this commitment, and are honored they want to partner with us to give back to a community that has served them well for nearly 50 years.

    Amstill Roofing was started by Frank Stilley in 1974. He and his son Sam have built Amstill Roofing into one of the largest residential re-roofing and roof repair companies in the area, taking care of thousands of homeowners needs.

    We believe our success for our staff and our company is directly due to our local communities, said Sam Stilley. Its hard enough living in a world where there are not enough people that wish to do good for others. We are proud to reach out to non-profits that could use assistance. The last thing we want them to worry about is a leaking roof over their heads when they have so many other things on their plate. We are looking forward to working with HomeAid and their agencies when the need arises.

    Amstill has already provided services to one of HomeAids newest nonprofit partners, VitaLiving, with a roof in 2020 that was damaged in a storm. VitaLiving is a 37-year-old nonprofit that provides long-term comprehensive care and support for adults and children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).

    Our company has been blessed by so many people whom have chosen us to do their roofing work and we believe in passing that blessing on, added Stilley. We are honored to be a partner in the process of making Houston an even better community.

    HomeAid was established in 2003 to work with Houston homeless care providers to build and renovate shelters that transform lives. Since 2003, HomeAid Houston has completed 54 projects that added more than $14 million in real estate to Houstons homeless community.

    For more information on HomeAid Houston visit http://www.homeaidhouston.org or call 281-970-8970

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    Amstill Roofing commits to roof repairs for HomeAid nonprofits - Chron.com

    Hearth, Home and Away showcases Columbus business – WHIZ - February 23, 2020 by admin

    ZANESVILLE, Ohio Hearth, Home and Away closed its doors on another year at the Colony Square Mall.

    At the event was an Columbus founded roofing company. Mathew Mahone for Roof Maxx says the product is the first of its kind.

    Roof Maxx is the worlds first all natural roof rejuvenating treatment. Its the first of its kind option aside from roof replacement. The product was actually founded by Mike and Todd Feezle from Feezle Roofing in Columbus, Ohio. So it is a locally funded product. It supports local farmers. It is a USDA bio-preferred product and has been researched by the Ohio State University who has released a research study on it showing Roof Maxx does exactly what it says it does.

    The treatment is a spray made of soybean oil. The oil restores the flexibility of a shingle which will extend its roof life by at least five years.

    Most people havent really planned on replacing their roofs. They havent saved up the money. Roof Maxx is about 80% less than a roof replacement and can get you at least five years. And you can do three treatments and get up to another 15 out of most roofs.

    Mahone says the oil does not include the allergen found in soybeans.

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    Hearth, Home and Away showcases Columbus business - WHIZ

    Buena Vista Historic Preservation Commission Presents Draft Protection Guidelines for East Main St. ‘Historic Oldtown’ Area – by Jan Wondra – The Ark… - February 23, 2020 by admin

    After 18 long months of work, the Buena Vista Historic Preservation Commission has reached the stage where it shared some of its findings with Buena Vista Trustees during a Feb. 11 work session. But the work is not done; the commission will incorporate Trustees edits for re-release by March 20, for public review and comment during an open public meeting. It hopes to deliver the formal draft recommendation document by early April 2020.

    The historic roof lines and cupola of the Buena Vista Museum recently went through a historic restoration, returning the cupola to its original appearance. (Photo by Jan Wondra)

    The commission was formed in 2018, because of the towns interest in preservation and desire for real guidelines to fulfill the mandate of the Buena Vista Comprehensive Plan.

    The goal: to maintain the architectural heritage of the community, protecting sightlines and the integrity of both historic structures, as well as the historic character of the main downtown area.

    The process, begun in Sept. 2018 by commission leader Dan Cartwright, has been extensive and transparent. There have been four public hearing sessions, social media and email interaction from the public and input from Main Street property owners.

    The boundaries of the historic area covered by the proposed guidelines are East Main, from U.S. 24 to the intersection with South Main, and one block north of Main to include the alleyways. The area roughly overlays the old town zone. The thinking here was to start small, protect the key assets, and protect the old town before going bigger, explain the commission members.

    The document presented during the work session compared the proposed architectural design guidelines for the downtown area, against the unified development code (MU-MS). The draft recommendations from the Historic Preservation Commission:

    Among the topics during the hour-long discussion, was a healthy debate over building heights of new construction on Main Street. Some members of the public advocated for more height, and others made the case to follow the commissions recommendation to limit building heights for new construction to 30 feet. The rationale for that recommendation; it minimizes the difference between the historic one-story structures along the street, such as the Lobeck Bakery, and new buildings taller than two stories.

    Those advocating for at least 35 ft. building heights (with a few asking for a maximum of 40 ft. for front-facing parapets) said that limiting new construction to 30 ft. buildings do not make economic sense for property owners. They pointed out that at that height, it was difficult to place a second-story apartment or condo unit above a retail space, which is important to the business decision to build in the first place.

    Proponents of the draft guidelines talk about mass and scale describing it as the human scale of buildings. They raise the feeling of walking down East Main and getting a sense of welcome. Commission members say they have studied building heights in 20 historic municipalities across the state and the scale averages about one and one-half stories tall.

    Historically, Buena Vistas building heights on Main Street have been limited to preserve sightlines to the majestic mountains to the west, as well as not to overwhelm the rooflines and cupola of the Buena Vista Museum, which began life as the Chaffee County Courthouse.

    At present, say, commission members, the only local landmark buildings on East Main that are protected on historic registries are the old Jail House and Town Hall, the Court House and the old Mothers Building. The only structure that is 100 percent protected is the Jail House.

    The Historic Preservation Commission points out that the guidelines concerning existing landmarks intend to provide information to those property owners about accepted best practices, to help preserve their historic asset and its value. The guidelines are not at this time perceived to be mandatory.

    Following feedback during the work session with Buena Vista Trustees, the commission is incorporating their comments and plans to have a draft recommendation ready by March 20. At that point, it will be released to the public, and a public meeting and comment period will begin.

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    Buena Vista Historic Preservation Commission Presents Draft Protection Guidelines for East Main St. 'Historic Oldtown' Area - by Jan Wondra - The Ark...

    Time To Help Is Now – Morgan County Citizen - January 31, 2020 by admin

    By Tia Lynn Ivey

    managing editor

    For over 35 years, the Clothes Closet has served families in need throughout Madison and Morgan County by providing free clothes and household items donated from the community. But now, it may be up to the community to help the Clothes Closet, located in downtown Madison directly behind the Morgan County Courthouse.

    The building, owned by Morgan County, is in dire need of a new roofa project expected to cost anywhere from $30,000 to upwards of $50,000. Currently, the several dedicated volunteers at the Clothes Closet have buckets set up to catch leaks from the roof while gaping holes in the roof are visible on the outside and inside of the building. While the county is currently collecting bids for the project from local roof contractors, the county has not yet committed to footing the bill for the new roof replacement.

    It all depends on the cost, said County Manager Adam Mestres, who noted completed bid packages will be presented to the Morgan County Board of Commissioners for review at the Feb. 18 meeting. We are looking for community partners to help with the cost, whether it be the city of Madison, the religious community, or others. But the roof is in bad shape will need to be completely replaced.

    Bernice Davis, 91, founded the Clothes Closet over 35 years ago and still volunteers every week, along with other long-time volunteers Dottie Kurtz, Lena Cole, Julia Osaby, and Pat Nesbitt.

    When we moved into this building, I thought Thank God, we will never have to move again, but here we are, said Davis as she sorted through donations at the Clothes Closet. This is just such a convenient location for people to get to when they are in need. You would be surprised how many people we have come through herethe families and the children who are helped by what we give out. People truly need this.

    Dottie Kurtz recounted helping a young a man find a new shirt for a job interview and single mothers with children find school clothes. Kurtz wrote a letter to the county stressing the Clothes Closets need for help.

    Right now its hard to imagine where we would go and still have the space we need and convenience to those who need us, wrote Kurtz, who stressed the important work the Clothes Closet does for the local community. Whether its a 4-year-old child who visited us weekly with her grandmother and watching her learn the value of volunteering with us, a homeless man coming in from the cold and being fitted for new socks and shoes, a group from a local church gathering clothes for a family whose home has burned to the ground, a young man seeking a nice shirt and slacks to wear to a job interview or a teacher at the Crossroads Alternative School seeking old shirts that can be repurposed to create their yearly public art project now installed at Farmview Market. Of course everyone coming through our doors doesnt have such a need but we have been able to help them with clothing, books and small household items so they can have a little extra money saved for their food and shelter.

    Kurtz also stressed the importance of the Clothes Closets current location.

    Our central location behind the Courthouse has been vital for those who seek our help and many walk or ride with others to visit us. Over the years these people have become extended family to the few of us who regularly volunteer our time each week, wrote Kurtz.

    Davis is hopeful that the county and community will come together to keep the Clothes Closet open and at the same location.

    We are very hopeful help will come through, said Davis. You know, when I started this all those years ago, it was just about helping people in need. Thats what we do here, what we have always done. It makes you feel good to know you have done good for somebody else. We just want to keep on doing that.

    The Clothes Closet is open to public on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The Clothes Closet is located in a small brick building directly behind the Morgan County Courthouse, off East Jefferson Street in Madison.

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    Time To Help Is Now - Morgan County Citizen

    Ridgefield condo owners insist their units aren’t ‘affordable housing’ – The Ridgefield Press - January 31, 2020 by admin

    Casagmo condominiums unit owners association has objected to First Selectman Rudy Marconi's suggestion that condos in Casagmo and Fox Hill might, with certain deed restrictions, count with the state as affordable housing.

    Casagmo condominiums unit owners association has objected to First Selectman Rudy Marconi's suggestion that condos in Casagmo and Fox Hill might, with certain deed restrictions, count with the state as

    Photo: Macklin Reid / Hearst Connecticut Media

    Casagmo condominiums unit owners association has objected to First Selectman Rudy Marconi's suggestion that condos in Casagmo and Fox Hill might, with certain deed restrictions, count with the state as affordable housing.

    Casagmo condominiums unit owners association has objected to First Selectman Rudy Marconi's suggestion that condos in Casagmo and Fox Hill might, with certain deed restrictions, count with the state as

    Ridgefield condo owners insist their units arent affordable housing

    Casagmo is in an uproar, triggered by First Selectmen Rudy Marconis suggestion that units in the Main Street condominium complex might help the town meet the states affordable housing requirements.

    As you may know, unit owners at Casagmo have invested heavily in recent years to renovate, repair and upgrade the complex, James Hulbert, president of the Casagmo Phase II and Master Associations, said in a Jan. 17 letter to Marconi. We have spent millions of dollars on siding and roofing replacement and are in process of completing a costly drainage/paving project. There have been other projects as well and future projects are planned.

    These projects have been initiated to protect and increase the value of the property to the benefit of all unit owners as well as to improve the quality of life for our residents, the letter reads. These investments coupled with the prime location off historic Main Street, within walking distance of all the downtown amenities, is making Casagmo a more sought after and desirable place to live.

    Marconi discussed the 307-unit Casagmo and the 287-unit Fox Hill condominiums off Danbury Road at a Jan. 7 public hearing of the Planning and Zoning Commission, concerning revisions to the Town Plan of Conservation and Development.

    Speakers at the hearing decried how the towns affordable housing law allows developers to circumvent local zoning if 30 percent of the units in their proposed projects would meet state affordability guidelines. Marconi noted that the town would be exempt from this provision if 10 percent of all housing units in town were deemed affordable by the state, and deed restricted so that theyd remain affordable for the next 40 years.

    Marconi had said many units in Casagmo and Fox Hill might be in a price range that would meet the state guidelines, but theyd need to be deed-restricted to satisfy the state requirement and count against the 10 percent needed to get out from under the towns affordable housing law.

    The Casagmo owners took umbrage with this.

    We want to let you know that we are caught off guard by your recent comments suggesting that the town should encourage units at Casagmo to become deed restricted as affordable so they can count toward the town having 10 percent of its housing stock meet state affordability standards, Hulbert wrote.

    Your comments made to the Planning and Zoning Commission during discussion of the draft Plan of Conservation and Development for Ridgefield have been published by the local newspapers (Danbury News-Times, Ridgefield Press), the letter reads. Casagmo is a private community and we are disappointed these comments were made without first letting us know or contacting us to discuss.

    One of the concerns at the complex appears to be a fear that prices could be hurt just by being mentioned as a location where units might count against the state affordable housing requirement.

    We understand there is a real need for affordable housing in Ridgefield, Hulbert wrote. However, we also have a concern that your published comments could have a negative impact on the overall value of our property and of our unit owner investments.

    For example, these comments introduce an unknown regarding the future of Casagmo and unknowns tend to concern potential buyers, leading them to wait and see what happens. Markets generally react negatively to uncertainty, Hulbert said. We also believe that the town government has no standing to force or encourage individual unit owners in a private condominium association to add deed restrictions which could change market value.

    Hulbert asked Marconi to publicly retract his comments.

    Asked by The Press if he had a response, Marconi said the comments were just an example of what we might consider.

    Read more from the original source:
    Ridgefield condo owners insist their units aren't 'affordable housing' - The Ridgefield Press

    Over $1 Million in Fall Hazard Penalties Sought by OSHA – EHS Daily Advisor - January 31, 2020 by admin

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited a Jacksonville, Florida, roofing contractor for fall hazards at three construction sites and is seeking $1,007,717 in penalties. OSHA cited Florida Roofing Experts, Inc., owned by Travis Slaughter, under its egregious citation policy with eight willful violations of the fall protection standard.

    Tong_stocker / Shutterstock.com

    Days earlier, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit found Slaughter; Florida Roofing Experts; and its predecessor firm, Great White Construction, Inc., in contempt of court for failing to pay $2,202,049 in penalties for earlier safety and health violations. Slaughter could face federal incarceration if he and his company fail to pay the outstanding penalties plus interest and fees.

    Employers that ignore multiple court orders requiring correction of violations and payment of penalties will be held accountable, Solicitor of Labor Kate OScannlain said in a Department of Labor statement.

    This enforcement action demonstrates that OSHA will utilize every resource available to ensure that safety and health standards are followed to protect workers, OScannlain said.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission issued 12 final orders to pay penalties for multiple egregious, willful, and repeat violations for lack of fall protection and other safety and health hazards cited October 2, 2017, and June 5, 2018, at worksites in Florida.

    The court held the companies and Slaughter in civil contempt on January 3, 2020.

    On January 9, OSHA cited Florida Roofing Experts for four new fall protection violations at a worksite in Middleburg, Florida, and four new violations at two jobsites in Fleming Island, Florida.

    New fall protection violations cited included:

    This employer has an extensive OSHA history with willful, serious, and repeat violations that has demonstrated an egregious disregard for the safety of their workers, OSHA Atlanta, Georgia, Regional Administrator Kurt Petermeyer said in an agency statement.

    The employer continues to allow employees to work without fall protection and has made no reasonable effort to eliminate the risk, Petermeyer said.OSHA has investigated Florida Roofing Experts and its predecessor, Great White Construction, 19 times within the past 7 years, according to the agency, resulting in 42 citations related to improper fall protection, ladder use, and eye protection.

    The agency now has placed Florida Roofing Experts in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program (SVEP) due to the high-gravity willful, egregious violations related to fall hazards.

    The SVEP replaced an earlier Enhanced Enforcement Program (EEP) deemed ineffective because agency personnel failed to consistently conduct follow-up inspections. Employers in the more narrowly focused SVEP are subject to mandatory follow-up inspections.

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    Over $1 Million in Fall Hazard Penalties Sought by OSHA - EHS Daily Advisor

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