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    Category: Porches


    Texas family hosts ‘prom on the porch’ when big dance is canceled due to coronavirus pandemic – Fox News - April 3, 2020 by admin

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    Once a prom queen, always a prom queen.

    One thoughtful family in Texas wanted to ensure that their high-schooler would still get a chance to enjoy prom this year, even though the annual dance had been canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic. So, in lieu of the big event, her folks threw a prom on the porch bash -- and the senior student was even crowned queen of the night.

    Grayson Chapman, pictured, at her "prom on the porch" party. (Jaci Chapman)

    AMERICA TOGETHER: UPLIFTING STORIES OF AMERICANS FIGHTING THE GOOD FIGHT

    Like many other school events, Highland High School called off the highly anticipated big dance, which hadbeen scheduled for March 28, due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Determined to make the night special for senior student Grayson, the Chapman family from Sweetwater hosted a prom on the porch party that evening.

    The family spruced up the outdoor space with household dcor, stars and festive lights. (Jaci Chapman)

    CORONAVIRUS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

    Grayson thought it sounded a little cheesy at first. But she was so excitedto get to be able to dress up after all and go to her last prom, Jaci Chapman, Graysons mom, told Fox News on Thursday. Once we started getting the porch decorated and cranked up the music, she really started getting into the spirit of it!

    Sprucing up the space with household dcor, stars and festive lighting, the Chapmans prepared the porch for their very own outdoor promenade. With respect for social distancing, just seven family members attended the very last minute soiree: Grayson, her parents, her two siblings, an uncle and acousin.

    Grayson, left, is pictured with siblings Crae and Maura Chapman. (Jaci Chapman)

    On Saturday night, Graysons older sister Maura, who is home from college,and her younger brother Crae, a sophomore at Highland High,also dressed up in their best formal attire for the porch party. Little cousin Gene Conway also looked quite dapperand was honored as "prom king."

    Prom queen Grayson and prom king Gene, pictured. (Jaci Chapman)

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    It wasn't the prom with her friends she thought she'd have, but she had so much fun!!! We all did! proud mom Jaci recalled. The kids dressed up, we cranked up a speaker, and spent two or three hours on our porch.

    Not surprisingly, my senior won prom queen!" she added. So this spring may not be going according to plan, but we try to adapt and celebrate our seniors the best we can.

    Determined to make the night special for senior student Grayson, the Chapman family from Sweetwater hosted a prom-themed bash at home for their high school senior. (Jaci Chapman)

    Grayson has had so many events canceled, and she's taken in all in stride. We wanted to do something special for her, mom Jaci explained. (Jaci Chapman)

    In a word of advice for other parents whose teens might be feeling frustrated or upset if the coronavirus has canceled their anticipated events, the Texas mom said she would absolutely recommend having a prom on the porch celebration.

    CLICK HERE FOR FOX NEWS' CONTINUING CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

    Grayson has had so many events canceled, and she's taken in all in stride. We wanted to do something special for her, Jaci explained. It wasn't at all the prom she had envisioned going to, but we've tried to teach our children life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you react to it.

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    Texas family hosts 'prom on the porch' when big dance is canceled due to coronavirus pandemic - Fox News

    Rocking Back and Forth on the Front Porch of Life – Thrive Global - April 3, 2020 by admin

    This morning, I remembered a moment from 50 years ago that is quite relevant to the challenging, Coronavirus times we find ourselves living in.

    I was 22, sitting in a rocking chair on the front porch of a house on Marthas Vineyard. As I sat there, the four-year old son of the couple who owned the house, came running past me. He was sobbing uncontrollably and I felt an undeniable urge to comfort him.

    Bobby, I said, reaching his way, lifting him up, and placing him onto my lap, Whats wrong, my little friend? And the two of us just sat there, rocking back and forth together for a while, Bobby slowly calming down.

    And then, just a few minutes later, his six-year old brother, Timmy, came running by. He was also sobbing, the same kind of super-sad tears Bobby had been crying just a little while ago.

    Timmy, I said, reaching towards him. Come on over here with your brother and me. Its all going to be just fine, whatever it is.

    And so, now, the three of us were rocking back and forth on that front porch, Timmys tears soon ending, as well.

    My job was a simple one, to hold the boys in my arms, continue rocking, and share some words of comfort. We continued that way for another few minutes and then, much to my surprise, their mother appeared from the back of the house. She was also sobbing.

    The same part of me that had reached out to the two boys just minutes before also wanted to reach out to her, but I noticed I had no more lap left and my arms were full. I was totally maxed. So I just looked up and did my best to comfort her with words.

    Yes, both of my arms were occupied, but I could feel my heart reaching out. I cannot say, for sure, if it made it all the way to her, or if she received whatever I was sending out, but it felt good to make the effort, really good Bobby, Timmy, and I continuing to rock back and forth together, on that front porch, for what seemed like forever.

    These, my friends, I do believe, are the times we are now living in. We are all on that front porch, so many of the people around us asking for comfort and support. While our laps might not be large enough for everyone and while our arms may already be full, we can still reach out. We can still comfort those in need. We can still, in a thousand different ways, extend our hearts in the direction of those who are needing support. Kindness is whats needed these days, my friends. Kindness and empathy. Kindness and generosity, love, patience, courage, and a whole lot of compassion in whatever form it takes.

    And you can begin this very moment with the people on your own front porch.

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    Rocking Back and Forth on the Front Porch of Life - Thrive Global

    Miss happy hour? You can have one at a safe distance with ‘Front Porch Pours’ – WCPO - April 3, 2020 by admin

    CINCINNATI A marketing firm located in Over-the-Rhine is taking a creative approach to bring people together while also practicing safe social distancing.

    AGAR, an experiential marketing firm located in Over-the-Rhine, is launching its first citywide "Front Porch Pours" happy hour from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The event is designed to bring people onto their front porches or to an open window where they can enjoy a drink and talk with their neighbors.

    "We started looking at how we want to keep our team engaged and what can we do for our city," said Andrew Salzbrun, a managing partner at AGAR. "We like spending our free time working on things for Cincinnati."

    AGAR helped organize BLINK Cincinnati in 2017 and 2019 and began hosting Danger Wheel, an annual adult big wheel race held in Pendleton in 2014.

    Salzbrun said for "Front Porch Pours," his team more than rose to the challenge of creating a citywide event focused on keeping people socially distanced while at the same time uniting and uplifting them.

    "We're excited to just get people out of the house ... to enjoy a shared moment," Salzbrun said.

    To that end, AGAR created a website where people can sign up to participate in Friday's "Front Porch Pours." When people sign up for the happy hour, they will receive a set of themed cocktail recipes, including one from popular Cincinnati mixologist Molly Wellmann.

    "I'm a huge fan of the House Beer one, since I'm a beer guy," Salzbrun said.

    Other featured drink suggestions include the "DeWine and Chill" and "Shut-In Shirley."

    People also will get a link to a curated playlist of happy hour music to listen to while sipping their drinks.

    "Our in-house record label, Old Flame, put together a really awesome two-hour playlist," Salzbrun said.

    He added the playlist features a lot of familiar songs people will be able to sing along with "but also a lot of local bands, bands whose shows are either being postponed or canceled."

    "We want to show them some love as well," Salzbrun said.

    AGAR looks forward to planning similar events in the near future, Salzbrun said.

    People interested in participating in "Front Porch Pours" can sign up at porchpours.splashthat.com.

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    Miss happy hour? You can have one at a safe distance with 'Front Porch Pours' - WCPO

    ‘Porch Portraits’ becoming the way many want to remember uncertain time – WZZM13.com - April 3, 2020 by admin

    KALAMAZOO, Mich. On the other side of the Coronavirus pandemic, how do we want to remember it?

    Many may not want to remember it, because it was a time of stress, job loss, sickness or even, death.

    A Kalamazoo man whose photography business closed soon after COVID-19 hit Michigan, has found a new focus that's providing memorable and creative images for families during this heightened sense of uncertainty.

    "My business dried up," said Brian Powers, who's been a professional photographer for 12 years. "I can't get into my studio, so there was nothing to take pictures of."

    He says a little more than a week ago, he saw some news stories from around the United States of photographers traveling around their communities taking 'porch portraits.'

    Soon after COVID-19 hit Michigan, photographer Brian Powers wanted to keep using his talent, so he's doing Porch Portraits for families.

    Brian Powers

    "They are professionally done family portraits, documenting how people are thinking and feeling during this pandemic," said Powers.

    He launched a Facebook page and invited all of his contacts to join it. Soon after that, people started scheduling time for him to come to their homes and take the photos.

    Soon after COVID-19 hit Michigan, photographer Brian Powers wanted to keep using his talent, so he's doing Porch Portraits for families.

    Brian Powers

    "On days when the weather has been good, I've done several porch portraits," said Powers. "The pictures are free. I upload them to the Facebook page and people can retrieve them from there and do whatever they want with them."

    Some people just want a nice, traditional family portrait taken while others create some signage that best conveys their feelings and mood during this time of extreme uncertainty.

    Soon after COVID-19 hit Michigan, photographer Brian Powers wanted to keep using his talent, so he's doing Porch Portraits for families.

    Brian Powers

    "I've seen all kinds of signs," Powers said. "Some saying, 'We'll get through this; We're in this together; The sun will shine again.'"

    Powers respects social distancing during each shoot. He stands at least 20-feet away from the families, while using a telephoto lens to zoom-in close enough to capture each moment.

    On Thursday, April 2, an entire subdivision of homes in Kalamazoo, Mi. scheduled to have him come out and take porch portraits.

    Powers took porch portraits at 30 different homes that day.

    Soon after COVID-19 hit Michigan, photographer Brian Powers wanted to keep using his talent, so he's doing Porch Portraits for families.

    Brian Powers

    "This is something kids who are old enough are always going to remember," said Rich Walsh, after Powers visited his subdivision and took his family's portrait. "Twenty years from now, they'll be telling stories like, 'I wasn't event allowed to go to school.'"

    Welsh went on to say, "This moment in our history is kind of like 9/11, Pearl Harbor and the Kennedy Assassination."

    Kristen Rowell, who lives in the same subdivision, says she was very exited when she saw the Facebook post about Brian's porch portraits.

    Photographer Brian Powers is out of work, but is choosing to use his talent and free time to document this uncertain time by taking Porch Portraits.

    Brian Powers

    "It's definitely had to keep spirits up during this time," said Rowell. "This is a very weird time and I wanted to have a family portrait to remember how strong we were through all of this."

    Photographer Brian Powers is out of work, but is choosing to use his talent and free time to document this uncertain time by taking Porch Portraits.

    Brian Powers

    Powers says he's closing in on having taken close to 100 different family porch portraits in the short time he's been doing it. While most of his clientele has been in and around the Kalamazoo area, he says he's willing to drive elsewhere in West Michigan to capture these images for people.

    "So far, I haven't had anybody say, 'Stay home,'" said Powers. "I'd like to do this for as long as I can and for as long as people want it."

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    'Porch Portraits' becoming the way many want to remember uncertain time - WZZM13.com

    Porch pirates and other non-violent criminals | Should they be arrested during the coronavirus? – KCENTV.com - April 3, 2020 by admin

    TEMPLE, Texas A viewer sent 6 News a video on Facebook of a man stealing a package off of her porch. She said, the Temple Police Department told her they couldn't arrest the man at the moment because of the coronavirus. She said the TPD told her porch piracy is a felony in the State of Texas. She claimed they said they would have to get him after the pandemic ended.

    So, 6 News reporter Cole Johnson reached out to the TPD to see if they arrested the man.

    Spokesperson Cody Weems said in an email that the officer who was on that call wasn't working Thursday so he couldn't confirm the status in the case. But he did pull information from the report, which said it is still an active case and charges will be pursued.

    "The officer located the suspect at a nearby residence. The suspect admitted to taking the package and retrieved the package from his residence," Weems said. "The officer collected statements from the individuals involved."

    But, is the TPD holding off on arresting people for certain crimes because of the coronavirus?

    Weems said the Bell County Sherriff's Office advised that it is not accepting inmates for certain non-violent misdemeanor offenses right now.

    "Officers are issuing citations when applicable to obtaining warrants to make arrests at a later date. However, officers are continuing to make arrests for felonies and violent misdemeanors," Weems said. "To reiterate, Temple PD will continue to file charges for nonviolent offenses and will make arrests once Bell County Sheriff's Offices begins accepting inmates again for such offenses."

    Major TJ Cruz of the Bell County Sheriff's Office said that when looking at arrestable offenses, it's a case by case issue. If an officer feels that someone does need to be arrested for an offense, they can contact the Bell County Jail to make arrangements.

    Also on KCENTV.com:

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    Your questions answered: Experts from across Texas shared advice, insight on COVID-19 crisis

    Central Texas COVID-19 live updates | Bell County reports 5 new cases, total now 51

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    Porch pirates and other non-violent criminals | Should they be arrested during the coronavirus? - KCENTV.com

    Front porch portraits document home life in the time of coronavirus – USA TODAY - April 2, 2020 by admin

    As a photographer, Cara Soulia feels her purpose is to document life. Its why she left a successful career in finance five years ago to pick up her camera full-time. So when thecoronaviruspandemic began to take hold of Soulias cozy Boston suburb, closing schools and forcing residents indoors, she worried about more than just her finances.

    Even though this is negative, its historic and needs to be documented, said Soulia, who lives in Needham, Massachussetts. I couldnt help but think, How am I going to document this time in history?' Then I got the call from Kristen.

    Kristen Collins helps Soulia market her family photographybusiness. She had been considering a similar question over coffee when she had a flashbulb idea: Why dont we go to these families and capture this moment in their lives where they are in their homes?

    Or to be more specific and socially distant, in front of their homes. The Front Steps Project was launched on St. Patricks Day, and it has since raised almost $20,000 for charity.

    Soulia and Collins started by pitching the idea to a handful of close friends and clients. Soulia would drive over, honk, and the family would be dressed and ready to step out the front door. Soulia would come no closer than 10 feet and do her best to pose them.

    Im used to being up close and moving them, Soulia said. Im not used to posing people with my words I dont even know everyones names.

    Once she gets the girl on the end or the dad in the frame and looking at her, she snaps a few shots and is on her way. In lieu of payment, she requests a donation to the Needham Community Council, a nonprofit that works to address health, educational and social needs in the community.

    Thanks to social media and word of mouth, Soulia and Collins were soon overloaded with requests through their online application form. Two other area photographers, Caitrin Dunphy and Topher Cox, joined the project. Together, they have shot nearly 400 Needham families.

    Perhaps even more inspiring was the response from other communities around the country as news of the Front Steps Project stretched to Georgia toIndianato California. More than 250 photographers contacted Soulia and Collins looking to capture their neighborhoods and raise money for local causes. A studio in South Carolina has families hold up a sign with a word or two about what this time has meant to their families. Aphotographer in Michigan calls them "porchraits."

    Now that pandemic has intensified, Soulia and Collins want to set another example for their fellow photographers:hitting pause. As of this week, The Front Steps Project is joining the movement to flatten the curve.

    We knew wed have a stay-at-home order, Collins said. We want to respect our government and community. We want the other photographers to see us as leaders who say when its time to stop, its time to stop.

    While Soulia and her 10-year-old daughter/navigator were hustling around the neighborhood, frantically clicking the shutter button, they didnt have time to stop to appreciate what they were doing. Now on hiatus, Soulia has had a chance to go back and really look at the images: families wearing everything from slacks to PJs, huddling together, trying to smile through one fleeting moment of normalcy in a time of staggering uncertainty.

    One of the most important moments was when we connected with the local hospital, Soulia said. There were nine ER doctors in blue scrubs with masks on. It was everything. The story of what was happening. I didnt have time to process it at the moment. When I got home, I couldnt help but cry.

    Tony Rehagen is a freelance writer in St. Louis

    Share this special story of resilience.

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    Front porch portraits document home life in the time of coronavirus - USA TODAY

    Math teacher shows up at student’s front porch to give her a one-on-one lesson while social distancing – CNN - April 2, 2020 by admin

    Since her classes are now all remote due to the coronavirus pandemic, Anderson emailed her teacher for help, rather than ask for it in the classroom.

    She expected some emails, or maybe even a phone call from her teacher, Mr. Chris Waba.

    But then the doorbell rang -- and she saw Waba, standing on her porch, holding a whiteboard and marker, ready to teach.

    The Madison, South Dakota student said while trying to complete her math homework, she couldn't ask her parents for help because they weren't home. Plus, she said, they wouldn't have been much help anyway.

    "My mom got all the questions wrong when she helped me before," Anderson told CNN.

    When Waba received Anderson's email, he responded -- but could tell she was still struggling with the lesson.

    For 10 minutes or so, Waba squatted on Rylee's porch as he went through three math equations. Rylee stood on the other side of the screen door, nodding her head as she followed along and took notes.

    "He made it easier to understand," Rylee said. "I appreciated him coming over."

    Rylee's dad, Josh Anderson, who is the head coach of Dakota State University's football team, shared the moment on Twitter. His post has since garnered hundreds of retweets and thousands of likes.

    "The picture just shows the length that which teachers will go to help their students at any cost during these times," Josh Anderson said.

    Waba, who has been teaching at Madison Middle School for 27 years, said it was a spur-of-the-moment decision.

    "I'm a better communicator face-to-face than (on) the telephone and I think students learn better that way," Waba said. "Teachers all across the nation have been thrown into a situation like this. I think we're all more comfortable being in front of our classes and that's where we'd rather be."

    By the end of their lesson, Waba said he could tell Rylee finally understood the concept because she smiled and thanked him.

    "That's what teachers are looking for, those smiles," Waba said. "That's the joy of being a teacher and that's what we do it for."

    Original post:
    Math teacher shows up at student's front porch to give her a one-on-one lesson while social distancing - CNN

    Porch piracy: Here’s what we learned after watching hours of YouTube videos showing packages being pilfered from homes – The Conversation US - April 2, 2020 by admin

    Deliveries of groceries and packages are soaring as physical retailers close their doors and tens of millions of Americans shelter in place. Moreover, the need for social distancing may encourage more delivery workers to leave packages unattended on porches rather than risk an interaction with someone who has the coronavirus.

    These conditions may be perfect for thieves, who prior to the pandemic were increasingly pilfering packages from homes across the country.

    About 11 million homeowners reported having a package stolen in 2017 and a separate 2018 survey found that almost a fifth of Americans said they had been a victim. Three-quarters of the 2017 thefts occurred during the day, and the average cost of the stolen items was close to US$200.

    I led a recent study of porch piracy to better understand how it happens. I enlisted the help of two graduate students, Melody Hicks and Zachary Hutchinson, to help me review the videos, and my wife Amy Stickle, a math lecturer, performed a statistical analysis to ensure accuracy of the data collected.

    We examined 67 home security videos uploaded to YouTube to observe the behavior of porch pirates before, during and after they stole a package. Our analysis, which documented 98 stolen packages, reveals some interesting trends and possible prevention techniques.

    We found that thefts typically transpired close to roadways, with packages being visible from the street in nearly all incidents of theft. Most packages that were stolen were of medium size and had brand names on the boxes.

    Very few thieves attempted to disguise themselves. As they approached residences, neither fences, cameras or vehicles parked in the driveway seemed to deter them. And a few thieves appeared to be actually following delivery vehicles.

    We noticed that to avoid suspicion when executing their heists, some thieves carried dummy items with them to reduce suspicion, such as paperwork, packages or other items to make their visit seem legitimate.

    In virtually every incident, a single individual approached the home and took the packages. In a third of cases, there was also an accomplice involved who usually served as a getaway driver.

    One aspect that particularly struck us was how quickly the thefts transpired. From start to finish, we documented several that took under 30 seconds to complete.

    In terms of solutions, recipients would be smart to try to ensure theres a secure container or location to store packages until they can be retrieved. Businesses should make sure to always notify customers when packages are delivered and avoid leaving them in the open.

    Put simply, our research suggests vigilance is key. And as more stuff arrives at our doorsteps, itll be easy pickings for thieves unless retailers, delivery companies, law enforcement and consumers dont do more to curb porch piracy.

    [Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversations newsletter and get a digest of academic takes on todays news, every day.]

    Original post:
    Porch piracy: Here's what we learned after watching hours of YouTube videos showing packages being pilfered from homes - The Conversation US

    The Porch Portraits Project: Two Bay City photographers capturing images of history as it happens – Concentrate - April 2, 2020 by admin
    The Porch Portraits Project: Two photographers capturing images of history as it happens – Concentrate - April 2, 2020 by admin
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