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    GREENFILE: The best lawn-growing weather of the season is now – The Journal Pioneer - September 9, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Growing a great lawn should be like rolling down a hill. A deep green, grassy hill.

    Easy.

    Many readers will want to turn their attention to the grass growing under their feet, as chances are, it has not been growing much until recently. Our long, hot and dry summer was not exactly grass-growing friendly.

    Once again, we come to the rescue.

    The best lawn-growing weather of the season is now.

    Even if it is dry where you live, there are some things that are consistent every September. Days get shorter, nighttime dew is heavy and generally, our evenings are cooler than they were just a month ago.

    We grow great grass in many parts of Canada because we can. Which is why sod growing is a massive business.

    Thickening an established lawn or starting a new one is much easier now than in spring.

    Let us help you get started:

    If weeds predominate, brown areas have occurred during the drought or bare patches appear for whatever reason (dog urine?) start by spreading a 6 to 8 cm layer of lawn soil or triple mix over the area. Rake smooth. Spread quality lawn seed at the rate of 1 kg over 100 m2 (2lb/1,000 ft2). Rake smooth again. Step on it or use a lawn roller, 1/3 full of water, to firm the seed and soil together. Water thoroughly.

    Follow the same advice, above, but be sure the area is weed free before you sow the new seed. Double the seed rate.

    Len Cullen, Marks dad and Bens grandpa, used to say that you could lay sod upside down in September and it would still grow. Mark knows this is true. Neither one of us recommend that you try it. Sod costs much more per sq. metre than seed but it is instant and this time of year it puts down roots in a hurry. Lay sod on a bed of quality triple mix or lawn soil that is at least 8 to 10 cm thick. The thicker the good soil, the better-quality grass you will grow over the long haul.

    It drives us crazy to see fall lawn food featured for sale this time of year. Retailers are responding to consumer demand for the product in September. We are all for The customer is always right mantra. But this time, they are wrong. The best time of the year to fertilize your lawn is in late autumn, like October or early November. A couple of weeks before the snow flies. The reason for this late application of lawn food is to build up the natural sugars in the roots of the grass plants, boosting grass plant nutrients in preparation for the long winter ahead. Yes, winter is coming. But not for three or four months, so do not get your woolly socks out just yet.

    Your lawn responds best to being cut at 7 to 9 cm high (two-and-a-half to three inches). The higher the better, as the longer the grass blades, the deeper the roots. And the deeper the roots, the more tolerant your lawn is of drought, overwatering, snow mold and disease.

    Use a mulching mower if you possibly can. Returning the grass blades to the root zone of grass plants is what Mother Nature intended (yes, her again).

    Speaking of Mother Nature therein is the point of the whole thing. We do not control the weather or the changing of the seasons. Nature provides all kinds of cues for us to do various jobs around the garden and right now, all the signs point to your lawn.

    Someday, perhaps, humans will control the tilt of the Earth, day length and weather patterns. But until then the best advice we can give you is to follow natures lead.

    Mark Cullen is an expert gardener, author, broadcaster, tree advocate and member of the Order of Canada. His son Ben is a fourth-generation urban gardener and graduate of University of Guelph and Dalhousie University in Halifax. Follow them at markcullen.com, @markcullengardening, and on Facebook.

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    GREENFILE: The best lawn-growing weather of the season is now - The Journal Pioneer

    Grazing Bites: It’s time to start thinking about fall – Washington Times Herald - September 9, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    The summer has flown by and, like it or not, I have to start thinking about fall activities that need to be accomplished long before winter decides to show up. It has not been an easy summer. It seems a lot of time was spent trying to catch up on things and either dealing with dry periods or trying to get something done in between rains. I was reminded recently that one of my uncles would say that he prefers a rain every Saturday evening. That way, activities could resume as scheduled Monday morning and moisture would still be enough. Weather will never be that predictable, but it would be nice.

    It is the time of year to be thinking about any stockpiled forage that you might want or need. Ive said it before, but if tall fescue has an attribute, it is as winter stockpile. It does need to be thought out some, and you will have to do some planning if you want quality forage for winter grazing.

    Any tall fescue fields that you plan on stockpiling to use in the winter need to be deferred from grazing starting immediately or better yet, last week. You want to be able to accumulate as much new fall growth as possible on these fields to create standing hay that you can use later.

    Graze, mow or hay the field to even out the stand and hopefully, with moisture, new vegetation will start growing if it isnt already. Apply 30-60 pounds of nitrogen if clover isnt at least 30%t of the stand. Urea works well as long as moisture is present. Judging how much clover is present can be misleading. There always appears to be more than there really is. It is best assessed by dry weights, and no, I dont expect most people to do that, but you can visually estimate it. If it appears to occupy about 50% of the stand and a white clover, then you can normally assume that in reality it is about 25% of the stand. If it is about 50%t of the stand and a red clover, then it is usually close to that %age. White clovers have a lot more moisture and dont account for as much dry weight as red clover when visually estimating them. Carefully graze fields heavy in clover prior to stockpiling to help promote the grass.

    Defer grazing and stockpile at least one acre of tall fescue per 1000-pound live weight that you plan to be grazing. Of course, more is better. Tall fescues greatest attribute is its ability to maintain its nutritional value throughout the winter. During December, January and February, tall fescue will really shine; the rest of the time it is only somewhat tolerable. Fall-grown tall fescue can average 13 to 18 % crude protein depending on how much nitrogen has been applied to the stand and will maintain good nutritional value on up into the spring when new growth starts to appear. Ive tested lots of stockpiled forage (much of it tall fescue) and the lowest value Ive ever seen with the fescue was 11% crude protein with 62% digestibility, and that was in early March right before new growth. At this quality, it is better feed than a lot of hay. The ergovaline, the endophyte toxin associated with tall fescue, is usually reduced after a hard freeze, so procrastinating on grazing it is a good thing.

    Always good to test forages and feed to make sure it is meeting the nutritional requirements of the animals utilizing it. I really wish orchardgrass would hold value like this over winter, but it falls apart quite quickly after hard freezes. Most people think that ergovaline doesnt pose a problem in stockpiled fescue because the ergovaline appears to concentrate in seed heads and stockpiled fescue is generally vegetative. Livestock eat stockpiled fescue better after a couple of hard frosts or freezing conditions. This suggests that there is still ergovaline present in infected fescue, reducing intake until after freezing conditions. Most studies have found that ergovaline content drops fairly fast after mid-December. Sadly, as long as endophyte-infected tall fescue is growing, it is probably still producing some ergovaline. I might like long, warm falls, but it can delay the ergovaline reduction. An earlier winter or cold weather tends to prompt lower levels of ergovaline. So, the best time frame to utilize endophyte-infected tall fescue is probably mid to late winter. Ergovaline in hay also reduces over time. I do believe that cooler, healthier soils tend to have lower ergovaline content, especially with good diversity.

    For now, let the fields used for stockpiling grow. Continue rotating through the rest of the pastures like normal, maintaining stop-grazing heights as much as possible. If you have corn stalks, hay aftermath or annuals that can be grazed, that may provide you more opportunity to defer those stockpiled fields longer and possibly grow even more stockpile. Corn stalk fields that are planted to grazable annuals create even more opportunity to stockpile and can buy you more growth time and grazing time. If you have crop fields close that can be grazed, there are a lot of opportunities, especially when these are planted to annuals. High quality forage can be produced in the fall if planted early enough. My favorite mix is spring oats, turnips or radish, and cereal rye. The oats and brassica come on early and with sufficient moisture can produce a lot of quality forage. The cereal rye remains fairly quiet in the background until spring and then it kicks in providing the opportunity for some spring grazing or just prime cover to no-till into.

    So, its time to be thinking about getting that fall annual mix planted. The earlier it is planted, the more potential growth you have. Fall oats are higher in water-soluble sugars and have a higher level of total digestible nutrients than spring grown oats and produce a lot of quality forage in a short time frame with sufficient moisture. Those oats and turnips grow fast under good conditions. Being able to get off pastures for a while in the late summer or early fall allows pastures to rest and grow more forage for use later; a perfect situation for some stockpiling.

    Ive been asked about how much space is needed for a winter-feeding area. There are several it depends involved: soil type, presence of heavy use area, drainage, vegetation type, certainly weather, and to a degree the type of feed used. I really hope that you dont need it too much, but it always should be part of your contingency plan.

    I usually plan at least 100 square feet of pad per animal unit. That is often not enough depending on the weather and length of time its needed. If you cant clean off the area over the period, then quite often, another site or extensions are beneficial. I dont like animals on any site more than 45 days. Concentrated areas will usually be totally denuded and can present erosion issues from loss of vegetation. If left on a larger area over winter, there are typically less concentrated areas but the entire area is grubbed extremely close, especially all new growth as spring approaches. This usually grossly retards forage growth and requires a long deferment before grazing again to allow desirable species to grow back. The more disturbance, the less likely that will happen and thus prickly pigweed, barnyard grass, cocklebur, goose grass, or any weed in general will take over. Id estimate that if the overwintering area is less than 1/4 acre per animal unit, severe damage to the forage stand and sod will often occur. A half-acre might be better mud wise, depending on the drainage and soils, but the vegetation can still be damaged; okay, probably another good topic in the near future.

    Remember, its not about maximizing a grazing event, but maximizing a grazing season! Keep on grazing!

    Reminders and Opportunities: More pasture information and past issues of Grazing Bites are available at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/in/technical/landuse/pasture/

    We are making critical coverage of the coronavirus available for free. Please consider subscribing so we can continue to bring you the latest news and information on this developing story.

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    Grazing Bites: It's time to start thinking about fall - Washington Times Herald

    No, FedEx Field didn’t switch to turf this offseason – NBCSports.com - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    On Sunday, the Washington Football Team tweeted a photo of FedEx Field's, well, field, along with a caption about how the NFL season is just about here:

    Pretty standard post, correct? Not exactly.

    Fans on social media quickly noticed how manicured the stadium's surface looked, which isn't something it's typically known for. And that prompted many to ask a question.

    Did Washington switch over to turf during the offseason?

    The answer to that is no.

    In light of all the curiosity that the team's picture sparked, NBC Sports Washington reached out to someone familiar with the groundskeeping at the stadium to confirm that it still features grass. They did just that.

    According to that person, FedEx Field's Bermuda grass was completely replaced in June. Fittingly, the sod used in that process came from the Carolina Green sod farm. That's just one more connection between the franchise and Ron Rivera's old employer.

    The person also acknowledged that not hosting concerts and other non-football events, which was common in the past, contributed to the improved appearance.

    Those two factors are why it looks so sweet right now.As usual, the middle portion of the field will be replaced in the middle of the year if necessary.

    So, there you have it. You can stop your zooming in on the picture and screaming about the matter on Twitter. Go scream about something else instead.

    Mitch Tischler contributed to this report.

    Read more:
    No, FedEx Field didn't switch to turf this offseason - NBCSports.com

    Front Porch: Thrilled to watch the green, green grass of home – The Spokesman-Review - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    I am watching the grass grow. Literally.

    About this time each year I usually write something about my garden a new flower, how the tomatoes are doing or what the deer have found particularly tasty this year but in 2020, the year of COVID-19, it really is about watching the grass grow.

    As I have said before, I came to this green thumb thing rather late in life and am continuously surprising myself at how much Im liking it. Who knew?

    Latest chapter Ive been paying attention to how the lawn in front of our house has been deteriorating in recent seasons. Yes, we weed and feed and water. And yes, its green, but full of gawd-awful weeds and who knows what. Last summer we had a weed guy give us some advice, which turned out to be that the lawn wasnt really salvageable. A landscape guy told us how to proceed from there.

    In addition, our sprinkler system had blown up, so that would have to be tended to as well.

    We killed out the lawn in the fall. In early spring, we again killed out any weeds that regenerated, and were all set for the landscaper to come in and lay sod in May, right after he repaired the sprinkler system.

    But before that could happen, the new coronavirus had shut everything down.

    Because I had already planted geraniums, salvia and sunpatiens out front, in anticipation of everything being up and working, I had to hand- and spot-water the blooming things. Surely, a minor inconvenience in light of how COVID-19 was ravaging the nation, but still something for me to deal with.

    Unfortunately, the landscaper began being harder to get hold of. Phone calls not returned. Things promised but not delivered. And finally, silence. I hope he didnt lose his company. But there I was in July, looking for a new guy.

    Meantime, I had potted, as usual, the assorted plants and flowers and tomatoes I keep on my back deck, up and away from the deer. These I always water using a hose connected to a water source below the deck. Im happy to report that I have a new dahlia variety doing well this year, plus the little succulent cuttings I brought home a year ago from the yard of my friend in California are also coming along nicely out there.

    With a good recommendation, I found another landscaper, but he was backlogged with his regular customers, so I had to wait. It didnt look like Id get a lawn in until the end of summer. He could (and did) fix the sprinkler system sooner, but I didnt want to turn it on just for border flowers, so I continued grumpily hand watering.

    Then one of his customers canceled a scheduled job, and we were able to get our new lawn on Aug. 3. Oh, happy day. Sprinkler system engaged and adjusted a couple of times, and a Kentucky blue grass lawn abounds out front. Were still in the heavy watering phase as the grass is putting out roots, but it is such a delight to see.

    I know theres criticism of lawns in general, which Ill gladly engage another day, but today, I am so happy just to watch my grass grow. And to tend my garden.

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    Front Porch: Thrilled to watch the green, green grass of home - The Spokesman-Review

    Try these five tips to protect and grow your home turf – Toronto Star - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Growing a great lawn should be like rolling down a hill a deep green, grassy hill. It should be easy.

    Many of us have turned our attention to the grass growing under our feet. Chances are, it has not been growing much until recently. Our long, hot and dry summer was not exactly grass-growing friendly.

    And, once again, we come to the rescue with some good news: The best lawn-growing weather of the season is now.

    Even if it is dry where you live, there are some things that are consistent every September. Days get shorter, nighttime dew is heavy and generally our evenings are cooler than they were just a month ago.

    We grow great grass in many parts of Canada because we can. The sod-growing industry is a massive business the provincial agriculture ministry says more than 4,000 hectares of sod are grown in Ontario alone each year.

    Thickening an established lawn or starting a new one is much easier now than in spring.

    Let us help you get started with these five tips:

    1. Thickening an established lawn: If weeds dominate your grass, or brown areas have occurred during the summer drought, or bare patches appear for whatever reason (if you have a dog or dog visitors, you know what we mean) start by spreading a six to eight centimetres of lawn soil or triple mix over the area. Rake it smooth.

    Spread quality lawn seed at the rate of one kilogram over 100 square metres (about two pounds/1,000 square feet). Rake it smooth again. Then step on it or use a lawn roller, one-third full of water, to firm the seed and soil together. Water thoroughly.

    2. Starting a new lawn: Follow the same advice, above, but be sure that the area is weed-free before you sow the new seed. Double the seed rate.

    3. Sodding: Len Cullen Marks dad and Bens grandpa said you could lay sod upside down in September and it would still grow. He said it after a young Mark protested his role on a sod-laying crew by turning his lengths grass-side down. Those strips, indeed, grew grass. But we dont recommend you try it.

    Sod costs much more per square metre than seed. But it is an instant solution to achieve good grass, and this time of year it puts down roots in a hurry.

    Lay sod on a bed of quality triple mix or lawn soil that is at least eight to 10 cm thick. The thicker the good soil, the better-quality grass you will grow over the long haul.

    4. Fertilizing: It drives us crazy to see fall lawn food featured for sale this time of year. Retailers are responding to consumer demand for the product in September. And while we are all for the service mantra of the customer is always right, they are wrong are fertilizing grass this time of year.

    The best time of the year to fertilize your lawn is in late autumn, like October or early November a couple of weeks before the snow flies. The reason for this late application of lawn food is to build up the natural sugars in the roots of the grass plants, boosting grass plant nutrients in preparation for the long winter ahead.

    Loading...Loading...Loading...Loading...Loading...

    Yes, winter is coming. But not for three or four months, so do not get your woolly socks out just yet. Nor your lawn fertilizer.

    5. Cutting: Your lawn responds best to being cut at seven to nine cm high (2-1/2 to three inches). The higher the better, as the longer the grass blades, the deeper the roots. And the deeper the roots, the more tolerant your lawn is of drought, overwatering snow mould and disease.

    Use a mulching mower if you can. Returning the grass blades to the root zone of grass plants is what Mother Nature intended.

    Speaking of Mother Nature, therein is the point of the whole thing. We do not control the weather or the changing of the seasons. Nature provides all kinds of cues for us to do various jobs around the garden and right now, all the signs point to your lawn (and dividing hostas well share those details with you in an upcoming column).

    And, along with our tips, the best advice we can give you to help grow a good lawn is to follow natures lead.

    Mark and Ben Cullen are expert gardeners and contributors for the Star. Follow Mark on Twitter: @MarkCullen4

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    Try these five tips to protect and grow your home turf - Toronto Star

    Global Impact of Covid-19 on Turf Grass Seed Market to Record Significant Revenue Growth During the Forecast Period 20202027 | Green Velvet Sod Farms,… - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Turf Grass Seed Market Overview 2020 2027

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    Key Competitors of the Global Turf Grass Seed Market are: , Hancock Seed, Pennington Seed, The Scotts Company, Barenbrug Group, Turf Merchants, Green Velvet Sod Farms, Bonide, Jonathan Green, Pickseed, PGG wrightson Turf

    Historical data available in the report elaborates on the development of the Turf Grass Seed on national, regional and international levels. Turf Grass Seed Market Research Report presents a detailed analysis based on the thorough research of the overall market, particularly on questions that border on the market size, growth scenario, potential opportunities, operation landscape, trend analysis, and competitive analysis.

    Major Product Types covered are:Cool Season GrassWarm Season Grass

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    Global Impact of Covid-19 on Turf Grass Seed Market to Record Significant Revenue Growth During the Forecast Period 20202027 | Green Velvet Sod Farms,...

    No tackling, new grass, 2020 expectations: 10 Cowboys observations and notes – The Athletic - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    FRISCO, Texas When the Cowboys return to the practice field, they will begin preparing for their Week 1 opponent, the Los Angeles Rams. Training camp is over. The roster is about to be trimmed to a final 53.

    To wrap up the past week at The Star, here are 10 observations and notes.

    1.) Players have the green light. Its unclear at the moment if Dallas will have several players kneel during the national anthem before the season opener to protest social injustice and police brutality. Defensive tackle Dontari Poe is the only player who has said he plans to kneel. The Cowboys have never had a player kneel during the anthem. In the past, theyve discussed doing something together as a team. Quarterback Dak Prescott said Wednesday that they continue to have private conversations on the topic, and its about expressing yourself.

    Thats what this country is about, Prescott said, the freedom to do...

    See the rest here:
    No tackling, new grass, 2020 expectations: 10 Cowboys observations and notes - The Athletic

    Vigo County looks to repave 65 miles of roads this year – Terre Haute Tribune Star - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    As a road grader removed sod to clear out and push back the edge of Frye Road, and a road sweeper cleared the remaining dirt, Commissioner Brendan Kearns and Larry Robbins, county engineer/highway director, discussed paving schedules on Thursday.

    Tribune-Star/Howard GreningerVigo County Commissioner Brendan Kearns looks over a map of Lakewood subdivision near Riley with Larry Robbins, county engineer/highway director, as the two discuss improving South Canal Street.Other subdivision road improvements are slated for next year.

    Frye Road is one of seven roads the county will repave this year at just over 22 miles in part with matching funds from Indianas Community Crossing grant as well as from the countys motor vehicle highway, cumulative bridge and economic development income tax funds.

    In all, the county is spending $6.5 million to repave between 65 and 67 miles this year, before the snow flies.

    Community Crossings covers the asphalt component, but this is the county, the machinery and manpower, doing the improvements before hand, Kearns said, standing along Frye Road as county dump trucks passed.

    A large section of Frye Road is to be paved next week. Improvements extend from Indiana 46 to Margaret Avenue.

    We had kind of a rough start this year with the [COVID-19] virus and everything going on, and we got behind on mowing and grading some roads, Robbins said.

    We had people out that were COVID-related issues on the highway department, Kearns added.

    Robbins said the best way to maintain county roads is to keep water off the road surface.

    This grass came over the edge of the road and then water sits, Robbins said, pointing to the edge of Frye Road. That is the section of the road that deteriorates and crumbles, he said. With dirt and grass taking over the edge of the pavement you get four to five feet of pavement that lays in water, then the subgrade gets wet and everything is impacted.

    We are pulling back these road shoulders and reshaping some of the ditches, to get water to run in the ditch where it is supposed to be instead of out on the road, Robbins said.

    Vigo County maintains 826 miles of roadway, with 671 miles of paved roads and 155 miles of gravel roads. Other roads paved using Community Crossings funds this year include Old Paris Road, Thralls Road, Park Avenue, Grant Avenue, Oregon Church Road and Louisville Road.

    Tribune-Star/Howard GreningerRough road: Vigo County Commissioner Brendan Kearns inspects alligator cracks along South Canal Street in Lakewood subdivision. The road is under consideration for repaving this year, with other sections of the subdivision slated for improvements next year.

    The county, Robbins said, uses a PASER system to evaluate roads. PASER, an acronym for Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating, is a system to visually rate the surface condition of pavement, from a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being pavement in a failed condition and 10 being pavement in excellent condition.

    Roads are evaluated on issues that include surface cracking, there is alligator cracking, there is rutting and shoulder cracking, Robbins said.

    The system provides a recommendation for repair. Roads with a rating of 7 to 9 may require chip and seal or a microsurfacing overlay. Get down into a 5 or 6 rating, the road requires deep patching or surface overlay work, while ratings of 4 and 3 require rebuilding the surface with two inches of asphalt overlay. A rating of 2 or 1 is a complete road replacement.

    For new road construction, most of the county roads are four inches [of asphalt] while others, like Springhill Drive, are up to 10 to 12 inches, Robbins said.

    That rating system is being used on other road work on tap for this year.

    Kearns said he is evaluating repaving South Canal Street in Lakewood subdivision, a road that pass in front of Riley Elementary School.

    Since we are paving Frye Road behind [the subdivision] and Louisville Road, this is a good opportunity to keep that momentum going and keep those improvements going, Kearns said. It costs about $79,000 per mile just for asphalt pavement, excluding road preparation, the commissioner added.

    Sign up for our newsletters to get the latest, breaking news.

    Robbins said South Canal Road had a rating of 5 in 2018, so it likely has a rating of 4 now, he said, adding the road has not been improved for about two decades.

    Kearns, while inspecting the road, said this is what is called alligatored. You can see how it kind of looks like an alligators back. The problem with this is when water gets in there, those alligator cracks get bigger. In the winter time, that will freeze and pop out that asphalt.

    Robbins suggested a phased improvement for Lakewood subdivision, with improvements done on roads on the east side of the lake this year, with road improvements on the west side next year.

    Reporter Howard Greninger can be reached 812-231-4204 or howard.greninger@tribstar.com. Follow on Twitter@TribStarHoward.

    We are making critical coverage of the coronavirus available for free. Please consider subscribing so we can continue to bring you the latest news and information on this developing story.

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    Vigo County looks to repave 65 miles of roads this year - Terre Haute Tribune Star

    50 photos from American life in the 19th century – Helena Independent Record - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    Photographs have a way of capturing emotion. A photo may echo sadness and desperation, as is the case with Dorothea Langes 1936 photograph known as Migrant Mother, showing a distraught mother and her children during the Great Depression. It may capture the spirit of triumph, as is accomplished with John Rooneys iconic 1965 shot of boxing heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali standing over opponent Sonny Liston. A photograph can also appear to signify hope and joy, la Alfred Eisenstaedts V-J Day in Times Square.

    Regardless of the scene or sentiment that is captured in a photograph, images from throughout history have the ability to freeze moments in time. In doing so, they allow future generations to peer into the past and obtain glimpses into life before their own, whether its the major events (e.g., Nat Feins The Babe Bows Out or Abraham Zapruders JFK Assassination, Frame 313) or the small moments (e.g. W. Eugene Smiths Country Doctor, or the first-ever cell phone photo, Philippe Kahns image of his newborn daughters first moments).

    Like any time period in the age of photography, the 1800s in America has been widely chronicled, in images dating back to the early years of the century. A look back on the images will take viewers to the countrys first boardwalk in New Jersey, make them grapple with the realities of the Civil War, and bring them along a journey to discover the evolution of transportation over the course of the decades.

    To learn more about 19th-century America through photographs, Stacker compiled a collection of 50 essential images that capture what life was like in the 1800s. Photos are sourced from a wide range of government databases and national photo libraries. From photos depicting iconic inventors and activists in action, to those simply depicting a day on the beach, each of these images shines a light on a small corner of American life between 1800 and 1899. Read on to view fascinating images and learn more about the events and trends that shaped 19th-century America.

    You may also like: 100 iconic photos that capture 100 years of world history

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    50 photos from American life in the 19th century - Helena Independent Record

    mmWave 5G Network Will be Exclusive to iPhone 12 Pro Max, Will Launch in Only Three Countries – Best gaming pro - September 5, 2020 by Mr HomeBuilder

    A digital advertising and buyer expertise chief, Evan Kohn is chief enterprise officer at Pypestream, the place he created PypePro, an AI onboarding methodology utilized by Fortune 500 companies.Extra posts by this contributor

    When folks attain out to customer support, theyre in search of greater than an answer to their quick drawback. They need empathy and understanding. What theyre typically met with is a queue.

    Nothing frustrates folks greater than calling buyer help and getting caught in a loop. Based on a research by Vonage, 61% of shoppers really feel interactive voice response (IVR) actively poisons the customer experience and solely 13% discovered it extra useful than calling a human immediately.

    Like many options, IVR falls short in personalizing the client expertise (CX). A buyer calls in for a selected activity like paying a invoice and as an alternative cycles by way of a one-size-fits-all menu that in actuality suits no one. Experiences like this clearly point out to clients a model doesnt care about them as an individual, solely as a case quantity.

    Personalizing the expertise is a begin, however this isnt the top. Prospects will count on a one-on-one interplay the second they enter your customer support channel. To make that occur, AI and analytics are creating scalable alternatives to point out your clients how a lot they matter to you. Manufacturers making the most of that chance can create unequalled CX that units them far forward of their competitors.

    Personalization has develop into a preferred buzzword in recent times, however true personalization is way tougher to achieve than many firms understand. That was the case in 2016 when companies first hopped on the chat bandwagon. The potential for a brand new communication methodology was there, however the one-size-fits-all method firms took in growing their interplay platforms created extra issues for patrons than it solved.

    What they missed is find out how to create digital experiences through which clients converse with automation that adapts based mostly on person context. Data like their services or products historical past and preferences needs to be pulled up the second a buyer engages. Knowledge on disposition, tone, sentiment and acknowledged intent ought to affect how the client strikes by way of the system and reaches their desired finish objective. That navigation needs to be easy and go nicely past text-based communications, together with immersive UX choices like maps, surveys, carousel picks and extra all in a spirit of reducing the cognitive weight for the client.

    Tech specialist. Social media guru. Evil problem solver. Total writer. Web enthusiast. Internet nerd. Passionate gamer. Twitter buff.

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    mmWave 5G Network Will be Exclusive to iPhone 12 Pro Max, Will Launch in Only Three Countries - Best gaming pro

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