Categorys
Pages
Linkpartner


    Page 3«..2345..1020..»



    Category: Office Building Construction


    Government center commission moves closer to council recommendation – Columbus Ledger-Enquirer - August 31, 2017 by admin

    The Mayors Commission on New Government and Judicial Building is getting closer to making a recommendation to Columbus Council on what to do with the 46-year-old structure.

    On Wednesday, architects presented members with three conceptual site studies to consider. Later, the group began making plans for a series of forums to seek public input.

    Before they put the pictures up, I just want to say, concepts are concepts, Mayor Teresa Tomlinson told the group, as architects prepared to share their PowerPoint slides. They dont necessarily go exactly on the property where theyre located. They dont necessarily look like that. Remember this is not the design committee. Our objective is to get some conceptual proposals to submit to council so that they can consider. And there would be another design committee, or however they want to structure it, in the future.

    Tomlinson said the commission plans to have four simultaneous public forums in about 10 to 14 days, which would give the city time to advertise the meetings. At the same time, the commission will be working on a rough draft of the report that will be submitted to council.

    And then were off to the races, she said. ... I dont want to make any promises, but I see this getting to council in the Octoberish timeframe.

    The conceptual site studies were presented by Tim Jensen, a partner with Hecht Burdeshaw Architects, and Michael Starr, a partner with 2WR. They presented three scenarios for the building:

    Scenario 1 - Renovation of the existing tower and wings

    Scenario 2 - Renovation of the tower only

    Scenario 3 - Total new construction

    Starting with Scenario 1, Jensen said renovations to the facility would involve totally gutting the building.

    If you imagine the existing structure is there, everything is gone, he explained. So, literally, at the end of the day when the demolition is finished, the sun will shine through, the wind blows through. All you have is structure. Theres no HVAC. Theres no electrical. ... Theres no skin. You would have the ribs that run throughout the building.

    ... Now, that doesnt quite get us enough space, he said. And so, what we would then do is have an addition that surrounds the tower to make up that space.

    Scenario 2 would require significant modification to include a multi-story base added to the existing tower, which would be used for judicial purposes only. The plaza would be removed and a two-level parking deck constructed. Another structure would be built on the site for city administrative offices.

    Scenario 3 would involve total new construction. The existing building would be demolished and replaced by two structures a justice center and separate city administrative building. Underground parking would take up the entire southern half of the block.

    Starr said Scenario 2 and 3 are common in that they include useable, public green space.

    It would rely upon spaces on the north and south side to say, Hey, citizens of Columbus, this is your space, and these are your buildings, he said.

    The plans also call for secure entrances for employees and judges, a situation that doesnt exist in the current building, causing safety concerns.

    The architects said the cost to renovate the tower and two wings (Scenario 1) would cost about $100,430,602, when demolition, construction and start-date of the project are taken into account. The cost for renovating the tower for judicial purposes and building a new city office building (Scenario 2) would cost $105,417,822. The cost for constructing two new buildings (Scenario 3) would cost $115,506,520.

    All three estimates include an increase for time through 2023. They dont include expenses for development of the interior.

    The concepts were developed based on 75,000-square-feet for city administrative offices and dont include space for city employees currently located at the annex, the architects said. But they agreed, at the request of commission members, to modify the site plan to include people from the annex, which would require another 27,000-square feet The proposals also include undeveloped space for future growth.

    It could be that we could sell the annex building and get some cash for all of this, Tomlinson said.

    Kristen Miller Zohn, a local art historian and commission member, asked if the facade and design of the building would be affected in Scenario 1.

    Yes and no, said Jensen. Its a new facade. But the intention is we could go back to something thats very similar in nature. ... Today, you have these two columns and what appears to be glass between them, right? So, everything will go away, except for the columns that you see. We would intend to put glass back in between there again, and there would be some other embellishments to the degree that we needed them for functionality.

    Zohn then said: So, in none of these scenarios does the original aesthetics of that style of building from 1971 remain intact.

    The architects said the amount of space available at the site, code restrictions and the security required for handling prisoners would prohibit the building remaining exactly the same as it is today.

    Stay 100 percent completely intact? No. Thats true, Jensen said.

    Here is the original post:
    Government center commission moves closer to council recommendation - Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

    Stark Auditor renovates offices to reduce public confusion – Massillon Independent - August 31, 2017 by admin

    The Stark County Auditor's office is temporarily on the third floor of the Stark County Office Building until December. Workers are renovating and reconfiguring the auditor's second-floor offices so the public has one common point of entry, so officials have a large meeting space, to improve security and to get all of the auditor's office staff not in the information technology department on one floor.

    CANTON Alan Harold became Stark County Auditor in 2011, and he noticed that several people would wander around his offices often looking confused.

    To execute a property transfer, people had to visit three locations in the "little maze we have here," in the auditor's office inside the County Office Building downtown, which stretched from the eastern side of the second floor by the county treasurer's offices, to the south side and to the west side by the commissioners' offices, Harold said. And the auditor's fiscal department was on the third floor. Visitors were often asking for directions to the department they needed.

    The auditor's second-floor staff moved up temporarily to the former third-floor offices of the Adult Probation department. The county has hired a contractor to reconfigure and renovate the auditor's second floor offices to establish one public entrance, convert office space into a large meeting space and revamp the office floor layout so Harold's entire staff can be consolidated onto the second floor.

    The work is scheduled to be completed by December.

    Harold said the office had more than one public point of entry besides the entrance by the reception desk. Any member of the public could pop into most auditor employee's offices with no notice. Harold felt it wasn't very secure. With the employees spread throughout the building, it made efficient communication between staffers more difficult.

    In addition, Harold cut his staff by 23 employees. Much of the old layout had empty space. He felt it would be more efficient to consolidate the second-floor staff and the third-floor staff into 14,000 square feet on the second floor and add new security features.

    Planning

    Last year, Harold and his staff started planning the entire office layout in consultation with the commissioners, who control some of the funding and oversee the building's operations. The cost of the contractor, NL Construction of Canton, ended up being $367,601 after the cost was estimated at $430,000. The architect, Motter and Meadows, cost about $27,000.

    About $100,000 of the bill is being funded from money remaining from the auditor's closed Bureau of Motor Vehicles office, which was shuttered in 2014, and about $300,000 is coming from the real estate assessment fund, which is funded by a percentage of property taxes collected.

    Harold has 78 employees. Twenty-seven work in the county's information technology department on Fourth Street NE. The remaining employees work in the Stark County Office Building.

    The staff moved out of the second-floor offices by July 20 and into the vacated third-floor offices of what was Adult Probation, which moved into the Frank T. Bow building.

    Consolidation

    Harold will return to his office on the second floor and near him will be stationed staffers who handle business vendor's licenses, dog tags, property tax supervision and Board of Revision appeals.

    The eight Fiscal Department staffers, who handle the county payroll for 2,600 county employees and the payment of $220 million a year in bills for the county, will vacate the third floor and move to the second floor, where the appraisers once had their space.

    It will be up to the commissioners to reassign the third-floor space to a new tenant.

    He said the workers will eventually remove asbestos in a safe manner from the flooring in the 50-year-old building, replace the 25-year-old carpeting and repaint the walls. Angela Blakney, Harold's executive assistant, who's been involved in much of the planning, picked out a light shade of gray for the new carpet. Harold's office will also buy new furniture and frame old county maps to display on the walls.

    Reach Repository writer Robert Wang at (330) 580-8327 or robert.wang@cantonrep.com. Twitter: @rwangREP

    Go here to read the rest:
    Stark Auditor renovates offices to reduce public confusion - Massillon Independent

    Home – Construction Office Online - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Construction Office Online has been developed by a Contractor for Contractors. We understand and appreciate the quickly evolving value and importance of technology in our industry and were committed to providing this technology in user friendly applications for all aspects of the construction industry.

    Our long term goal is to develop templates, software and online applications for use all over the world. Our experience allows us to create these specifically tailored for construction companies with the entire building process in mind.

    Looking for a solution customized to your business? We have you covered. If your sales volume is over 10 Million per year, we have a solution that will fit perfectly. Stop worrying about overhead of hardware appliances like IT Department staff, servers, routers, and associate network infrastructure necessary to be efficient and productive. Your central point of management will be online where everyone can access what they need, when they need it. Collaboration will be at a new level.

    To learn more about the Construction Office Online Web Office Suite, contact us now at 1+(888) 699-6960 and ask us about upgrading your company to a new web based management solution.

    See the original post:
    Home - Construction Office Online

    Mortenson, MSR to team up on city office building – Finance and Commerce - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle and Mortenson Construction are poised to design and build the city of Minneapolis new downtown office building, an up to 10-story structure that will consolidate city employees.

    The citys staff is recommending Minneapolis-based MSR Design, teaming with Copenhagen-based Henning Larsen Architects, for the $6.2 million architecture and engineering contract. The staff is going with Golden Valley-based Mortenson for the $4.7 million construction management contract.

    The recommendations, based on a competitive bidding process, are expected to go before the City Council on Thursday. The citys Ways and Means Committee approved the recommendation Monday.

    A parking ramp at 501 Fourth Ave. S. in downtown Minneapolis will be torn down to make way for the new building, which will be seven to 10 stories high with 250,000 to 300,000 square feet of interior space. The site is diagonally across from City Hall, at 350 S. Fifth St.

    The city hopes to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold-level certification for the new building. LEED Gold is the U.S. Green Building Councils second-highest certification level for resource-efficient buildings.

    Josh Stowers, principal and architect with MSR, said in an interview that its too early to share specifics on the design. But he said the new tower will be a very sustainable building that will last the test of time.

    I am a true believer in what they are trying to do, Stowers said.

    In a press release, the city said it has been exploring plans for a new downtown office building since 1999. At present, several hundred city employees work downtown in seven leased or city-owned buildings. Some of the buildings need maintenance and renovation.

    Sarah McKenzie, the citys media relations coordinator, said the project will be financed by city bonding. The projects cost hasnt been determined yet, she said.

    The city plans to sell two buildings in connection with the project: the City of Lakes building, 309 Second Ave. S., and the Public Service Center, 250 S. Fourth St., McKenzie said.

    Schematic design for the new building is expected to begin in September, followed by parking ramp demolition in summer 2018 and construction in fall 2018. The new building will be complete by summer 2020, according to the city.

    A designer-selection panel considered factors that include experience, key team members, the proposers understanding of the project objectives and other factors, according to city documents.

    Thirteen teams responded to the citys request for qualifications for design services, and the city received four proposals for the construction-management contract, according to city documents.

    Perkins + Will provided predesign and planning services.

    The new office building will house offices, public service areas, break and staff spaces, a public lobby, conference rooms, and short-term parking, according to a request for proposals. One level of underground parking is planned for staff and building visitors.

    Demolition is expected to cost $2.5 million, not including abatement, soft costs and contingency, the RFP noted.

    Related:

    See original here:
    Mortenson, MSR to team up on city office building - Finance and Commerce

    Office building planned for former St. Jean the Baptiste Church in Troy – Albany Times Union - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    St. Jean Baptiste Roman Catholic Church on Second Street. (Rensselaer County Historical Society) Click through the gallery to view how other churches around the area have been transformed.

    St. Jean Baptiste Roman Catholic Church on Second Street. (Rensselaer County Historical Society) Click through the gallery to view how other churches around the area have been transformed.

    in Troy, N.Y., on Sept. 7, 2010. RPI fraternity converted the church into a house for their brothers. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    in Troy, N.Y., on Sept. 7, 2010. RPI fraternity converted the church into a house for their brothers. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    Friday July 11, 2014, on Third Street in Troy, N.Y. was bought by an RPI fraternity. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    Friday July 11, 2014, on Third Street in Troy, N.Y. was bought by an RPI fraternity. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    Fraternity sign outside the former First Baptist Church Friday July 11, 2014, on Third Street in Troy, N.Y. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    Fraternity sign outside the former First Baptist Church Friday July 11, 2014, on Third Street in Troy, N.Y. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    Two pianos are just a couple of the contents in the First Baptist Church to be auctioned off by Collar City Auctions on Thursday March 7, 2013 in Troy, N.Y. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    Two pianos are just a couple of the contents in the First Baptist Church to be auctioned off by Collar City Auctions on Thursday March 7, 2013 in Troy, N.Y. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    The mechanics of an old clock in the bell tower of the First Baptist Church on Thursday March 7, 2013, in Troy, N.Y. Uncle Sam worshipped at this church. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    The mechanics of an old clock in the bell tower of the First Baptist Church on Thursday March 7, 2013, in Troy, N.Y. Uncle Sam worshipped at this church. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    Exterior of a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices known as Delmar Family Medicine in Slingerlands, N.Y.

    Exterior of a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices known as Delmar Family Medicine in Slingerlands, N.Y.

    Dr. Peter Forman talks gives a tour of the former Methodist church he turned into medical.

    Dr. Peter Forman talks gives a tour of the former Methodist church he turned into medical.

    Exam room and hallway in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    Exam room and hallway in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    Side door leading to apartments in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    Side door leading to apartments in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    Exam room in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    Exam room in a former Methodist church Dr. Peter Forman turned into medical offices.

    on Mill Street, which became the Contemporary Artists Center, Woodside. (Luanne M. Ferris / Times Union)

    on Mill Street, which became the Contemporary Artists Center, Woodside. (Luanne M. Ferris / Times Union)

    View of an artist's workspace in one of the buildings on the campus of the Contemporary Artists Center. (Luanne M. Ferris / Times Union)

    View of an artist's workspace in one of the buildings on the campus of the Contemporary Artists Center. (Luanne M. Ferris / Times Union)

    at 101st and 6th avenues in North Troy became a children's puppet theater before it was converted into the Sanctuary for Independent Media in 2005. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    at 101st and 6th avenues in North Troy became a children's puppet theater before it was converted into the Sanctuary for Independent Media in 2005. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times

    Steve Pierce and Branda Miller, who run the Sanctuary for Independent Media in Troy, New York, 02/19/2010.(Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    Steve Pierce and Branda Miller, who run the Sanctuary for Independent Media in Troy, New York, 02/19/2010.(Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    became the Schenectady Light Opera Company in Schenectady, NY. Volunteers renovated the church on Franklin Street. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    became the Schenectady Light Opera Company in Schenectady, NY. Volunteers renovated the church on Franklin Street. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union)

    Scenery paintings line the stairway of the secondary building on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, at Schenectady Light Opera Company in Schenectady, N.Y. (Cindy Schultz / Times Union)

    Scenery paintings line the stairway of the secondary building on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, at Schenectady Light Opera Company in Schenectady, N.Y. (Cindy Schultz / Times Union)

    on Eastern Avenue in Schenectady became The Renaissance Restaurant at The Hall. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    on Eastern Avenue in Schenectady became The Renaissance Restaurant at The Hall. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    The former St. Mary's Church on Eastern Avenue in Schenectady. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    The former St. Mary's Church on Eastern Avenue in Schenectady. (Michael P. Farrell/Times Union)

    became Universal Preservation Hall in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    became Universal Preservation Hall in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    Teddy Foster, campaign director for Universal Preservation Hall, sits in the balcony in the great hall of the building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    Teddy Foster, campaign director for Universal Preservation Hall, sits in the balcony in the great hall of the building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    A view of the great hall in the Universal Preservation Hall building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    A view of the great hall in the Universal Preservation Hall building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    A view of the apse inside the great hall in the Universal Preservation Hall building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    A view of the apse inside the great hall in the Universal Preservation Hall building on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    on New Scotland Avenue became Overit Media's new home in Albany, NY. (Philip Kamrass / Times Union)

    on New Scotland Avenue became Overit Media's new home in Albany, NY. (Philip Kamrass / Times Union)

    The sanctuary of St. Teresa de Avila Church at 435 New Scotland Ave., Albany before it was remodeled to become the production floor of Overit Media.

    The sanctuary of St. Teresa de Avila Church at 435 New Scotland Ave., Albany before it was remodeled to become the production floor of Overit Media.

    in Cohoes became The Venue at St. Joseph's, an event space. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    in Cohoes became The Venue at St. Joseph's, an event space. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    A table setting at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    A table setting at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Interior of Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, their renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Interior of Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, their renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    The altar at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    The altar at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Dan and Jennifer O'Neill in The Venue at St. Joseph's, their renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Dan and Jennifer O'Neill in The Venue at St. Joseph's, their renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Detail from the upstairs bar at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Detail from the upstairs bar at Dan and Jennifer O'Neill's The Venue at St. Joseph's, a renovated church now an event space Wednesday Nov. 11, 2015 in Cohoes, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    became Grand Street Community Arts in Albany, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    became Grand Street Community Arts in Albany, NY. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Grand Street Community Arts hosts a lunchtime tour to showcase 2016 renovation plans for St. Anthony's Church. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Grand Street Community Arts hosts a lunchtime tour to showcase 2016 renovation plans for St. Anthony's Church. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

    Edwards Grimes-Carrion stands on the balcony at the Grand Street Community Arts center Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 in Albany, N.Y.

    Edwards Grimes-Carrion stands on the balcony at the Grand Street Community Arts center Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 in Albany, N.Y.

    on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Bell tower on the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Bell tower on the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Roofline detail on the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Roofline detail on the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Front door of the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    Front door of the Church of St Jean Baptiste on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Troy, N.Y. The 2nd St. building will be knocked down to build an office building. (Will Waldron/Times Union)

    on Third Ave. on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, in the Lansingburgh neighborhood of Troy, N.Y. A Latham company is seeking zoning variances to convert a closed Lutheran church into a five-unit apartment building.(Will Waldron/Times Union)

    on Third Ave. on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, in the Lansingburgh neighborhood of Troy, N.Y. A Latham company is seeking zoning variances to convert a closed Lutheran church into a

    on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy, is expected to be converted to housing. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy, is expected to be converted to housing. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    A view of St. Mary's Church on the corner of Third and Washington on Monday, July 18, 2011 in Troy. (Paul Buckowski / Times Union archive)

    See the rest here:
    Office building planned for former St. Jean the Baptiste Church in Troy - Albany Times Union

    GreenPower ramps up for production – Porterville Recorder - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Chairman says bus assembly ready to begin

    The chairman of GreenPower Motor Company Inc. said last week the company is ready to begin assembling buses in Porterville.

    An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

    Need an account? Create one now.

    kAm%96 =625:?8 56G6=@A6C @7 2==6=64EC:4 3FD6D[ FA52E65 :ED 4@?DECF4E:@? A=2?D @? :ED 2DD6>3=J A=2?E 😕 !@CE6CG:==6 2?5 2=D@ D2:5 :E 😀 C625J E@ 368:? 7:?2= 2DD6>3=J @7 3FD6D 😕 EH@ E6>A@C2CJ 92?82CD 2E E96 !@CE6CG:==6 p:CA@CE]k^Am

    kAmuC2D6C pE<:?D@?[ vC66?!@H6C 492:C>2?[ D2:5 (65?6D52J E96J 2C6 G6CJ 4=@D6 E@ 368:??:?8 4@?DECF4E:@? @? :ED A=2?E 2E E96 2:CA@CE 2?5 96 😀 A=62D65 H:E9 E96 A@D:E:@? E96 4@>A2?J 92D >2?2865 E@ >2<6 :? E96 6=64EC:4 3FD >2C<6E]k^Am

    kAm(6C6 AC6EEJ 6I4:E65] xED 2 ?:46 =2F?49 E@ 6DE23=:D9 E96 6=64EC:4 3FD 3FD:?6DD[ 96 D2:5 @7 E96 AC@>:D6 @7 `` @C56CD 7@C 6=64EC:4 D49@@= 3FD6D] %96 4@>A2?J 😀 @?=J H2:E:?8 7@C E96 D49@@= 5:DEC:4ED E@ 36 2H2C565 E96 7F?5:?8 E@ 368:? 3F:=5:?8 E96 7F==J6=64EC:4 3FD6D]k^Am

    kAm%96C6D 2 =@E @7 6?E9FD:2D>[ 96 D2:5 @7 4FDE@>6CD] (6C6 2E 2 A@:?E E92E :?DE625 @7 DA6?5:?8 6IA=@C:?8 E:>6[ E96JC6 DE2CE:?8 E@ =@@< 2E 3FJ:?8]k^Am

    kAmvC66?!@H6C 92D =62D65 EH@ 2:CA@CE 92?82CD 😕 !@CE6CG:==6 H9:49 H:== 6?23=6 :E E@ AC@5F46 2== @7 E96 6=64EC:4 3FD6D 7@C E96 @C56CD 2?5 4@>>:E>6?ED @G6C E96 ?6IE J62C[ :?4=F5:?8 E96 @C56C 7@C `_ 3FD6D 7C@> E96 r:EJ @7 !@CE6CG:==6]k^Am

    kAm(6C6 C625J E@ 2DD6>3=6 3FD6D E@52J 😕 !@CE6CG:==6[ 96 D2:5]k^Am

    kAmvC66?!@H6C 😀 ?@H 9625BF2CE6C65 😕 !@CE6CG:==6 2?5 pE<:?D@? D2:5 E96J H:== 36 23=6 E@ 5@ 7:?2= 2DD6>3=J 😕 E96 92?82CD F?E:= E96:C ?6H A=2?E 😀 4@>A=6E65] w6 D2:5 E96J 2C6 2H2:E:?8 2AAC@G2= 7C@> E96 r:EJ @7 !@CE6CG:==6 @? :ED :?7C2DECF4EFC6 H@C< 2?5 @?46 E92E :D 4@>A=6E65[ E96J H:== 368:? H@C< @? !92D6 ` @7 :ED A=2?E] %96 7:CDE A92D6 :?G@=G6D E96 4@?DECF4E:@? @7 E96 EH@DE@CJ @77:46 3F:=5:?8 2D H6== 2D @?6 @7 E9C66 3F:=5:?8D 4@>AC:D:?8 E96 >2?F724EFC:?8 724:=:EJ[ E@E2==:?8 de[___ DBF2C6 766E] %9:D 7:CDE A92D6 H:== 2==@H vC66?!@H6C E@ C2>A FA :ED AC@5F4E:@? 😕 E96 D9@CE E6C> 2?5 H:== 36 FD65 7@C 7:?2= 2DD6>3=J 27E6C E96 724:=:EJ 92D 366? 4@>A=6E65]k^Am

    kAmvC66?!@H6C AFC492D65 h]b 24C6D @7 =2?5 24C@DD 7C@> E96 !@CE6CG:==6 |F?:4:A2= p:CA@CE =2DE J62C] %96 4@>A2?J A=2?D E@ 4@?DECF4E 2 `cc[___ DBF2C6 7@@E A=2?E 😕 E9C66 A92D6D]k^Am

    kAm%96 r:G:=[ qF:=5:?8[ t?8:?66C:?8 2?5 u@@E:?8D A=2?D 2=@?8 H:E9 E96 $@:= #6A@CE 2?5 E96 $E@C> (2E6C !@==FE:@? !C6G6?E:@? !=2? 92G6 366? DF3>:EE65 E@ E96 r:EJ @7 !@CE6CG:==6D qF:=5:?8 s6A2CE>6?E 7@C C6G:6H] vC66?!@H6C 6IA64ED E@ C646:G6 4@>>6?ED 7C@> E96 r:EJ 😕 $6AE6>36C[ 2E H9:49 E:>6 E96 4@>A2?J H:== 7:?2=:K6 :ED 4@?DECF4E:@? E:>6E23=6[ 3F586E 2?5 7:?2?4:?8 7C@> EC25:E:@?2= =6?56CD 😕 E96 4@?DECF4E:@? :?5FDECJ]k^Am

    kAmpE<:?D@? D2:5 E96 3F:=5:?8 :ED6=7 D9@F=5 @?=J E2<6 2 4@FA=6 @7 >@?E9D E@ 4@?DECF4E]k^Am

    kAm!@CE6CG:==6 r:EJ |2?286C y@9? {@==:D D2:5 E96 4:EJ D9@F=5 2AAC@G6 E96 A6C>:ED 😕 $6AE6>36C] w6 D2:5 E96 3F:=5:?8 😀 A2CE:2==J AC6723C:42E65 2?5 :E D9@F=5 ?@E E2<6 =@?8 E@ 4@?DECF4E :E @?46 E96 :?7C2DECF4EFC6 H@C< :D 4@>A=6E65]k^Am

    kAmpE E96 6?5 @7 yF=J[ E96 4@>A2?J 2AA@:?E65 4@?DECF4E:@? G6E6C2? {6@?2C5 |24< E@ E96 A@D:E:@? @7 r@?DECF4E:@? !C@;64E |2?286C] |24< 92D 244F>F=2E65 @G6C b_ J62CD @7 5:G6CD6 6IA6C:6?46 H@C<:?8 :? E96 4@?DECF4E:@? :?5FDECJ[ 56G6=@A:?8 4@>>6C4:2= 2?5 C6D:56?E:2= AC@;64ED 7@C >2;@C 56G6=@A>6?E 4@>A2?:6D 2?5 @H?:?8 9:D @H? 4@?DECF4E:@? 7:C>] w6 H:== 36 @G6CD66:?8 2== 2DA64ED @7 4@?DECF4E:@? 7@C E9:D >2?F724EFC:?8 724:=:EJ[ D2:5 pE<:?D@?]k^Am

    kAmpE<:?D@? D2:5 2D E96J C2>A FA E96 3F:=5:?8 @7 3FD6D[ E96J 4@F=5 6G6? FE:=:K6 2 E9:C5 AC@A6CEJ 😕 E@H? F?E:= E96 A=2?E 😀 C625J]k^Am

    kAmQxE H@F=5 36 2?@E96C D9@CEE6C> 2CC2?86>6?E[ 96 D2:5]k^Am

    kAmpE<:?D@? 25565 E96J D9@F=5 36 =@@<:?8 E@ 9:C6 6IEC2 96=A :? =2E6 $6AE6>36C]k^Am

    kAm(6 H:== A@DE :E @? @FC H63D:E6 😕 5F6 4@FCD6[ 96 D2:5[ 6IA=2:?:?8[ @?46 H6 86E 3F=< @7 C6G:6H AC@46DD E9C@F89 H:E9 E96 r:EJ @7 !@CE6CG:==6[k^Am

    kAmvC66?!@H6C[ H9:49 7:CDE 42>6 E@ !@CE6CG:==6 😕 E96 72== @7 a_`d[ @776CD 2 C2?86 @7 6=64EC:4 A@H6C65 3FD6D 56A=@J:?8 6=64EC:4 5C:G6 2?5 32EE6CJ E649?@=@8:6D H:E9 2 =:89EH6:89E 492DD:D 2?5 =@H 7=@@C @C 9:89 7=@@C 3@5J]k^Am

    kAmxE @776CD D6G6C2= 5:776C6?E D:K6D @7 EC2?D:E 3FD6D[ :?4=F5:?8 2 `__A2DD6?86C 5@F3=6564<6C 3FD[ 2?5 92D C646?E=J 25565 7F==D:K6 D49@@= 3FD6D]k^Am

    The rest is here:
    GreenPower ramps up for production - Porterville Recorder

    McCarthy Building Companies helps make Marin County healthier – Building Design + Construction (press release) (registration) (blog) - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Marin General Hospital is getting a new home, a half-billion dollar design-build project helmed by McCarthy Building Companies. Constructing a highly specialized building such as a healthcare facility is never easy, as user demands are constantly evolving to meet the latest standards ensuring the best possible health outcomes, and all construction must meet rigid California Office of Statewide Planning and Health Development (OSHPD) specifications on safety and disaster preparedness which, in California, most often means earthquakes.

    The first phase of the project, the replacement of the existing hospital building, will be completed by 2020. Along with the challenges of maintaining an existing hospital facility while building a new one ten feet away, explains Terry Ng, Design Manager at McCarthy, the design-build team worked hard to create a collaborative platform to connect multidisciplinary designers and trade partners located throughout the country. This makes for a challenging building environment, to say the least. The design team relies on Bluebeam Revu and Studio technology solutions to ensure that everything goes to plan. Using Studio Sessions, they manage documents, communicate across their team, supervise subcontractors, and coordinate with facilities management at the hospital.

    We approached this project with an incremental permitting approach, explains Chris Blelloch, who is a Senior Engineer at the company. That means designing and building in phases, seeking plan approval for upcoming work in parallel with construction of earlier permitted phases. This is a risky approach, but a speedier one, and the team felt comfortable doing so knowing they had such precise control over their documents, and the ability to share comments and updates directly in real time. We actually used preconstruction Bluebeam Studio Sessions to house all of our working construction documents. So while all the designers would work in CAD or Revit or whatever their go-to design software was, we use Studio to combine and slip-sheet, and manage all live documents throughout the construction project.

    And while McCarthy, one of the countrys top builders, has long been using Bluebeams software across the company, never before had the Pacific Northwest office used it for this long, this robustly, as on the Marin Hospital, says Ng. Blelloch adds, Using it in more of a preconstruction fashion and making it more of a collaborative tool for all tradesthats the leap that was made by our folks here. That drew upon a lot of experience at the company.

    As the new structure begins to rise steel erection will be completed by summers end the design team continues to rely on Revus capabilities to keep everybody on the same page, demonstrating models or modifications when meeting with the end users or the hospitals facilities department. We use Revu to show them what their design will look like, and its a lot easier than showing them plans or describing it to them verbally, says Ng.

    As the 2020 completion date approaches and Marin County gets closer to welcoming a new, first-class hospital building, McCarthy will continue to lean on Bluebeam solutions to help solve the most critical issues, and to keep their information safe, secure and organized, even as plans constantly evolve and they graduate from one phase to the next. The big risk in a project like this is the transfer of information from one scope to another that really needs to be managed closely. Bluebeam has really helped us create transparency between all that, so we can expedite the communication between the necessary parties as were erecting steel, dealing with OSHPD as an agency and our end users. The software brings it all together. Thats good news for the McCarthy team, and good news for Marin County, as well.

    Read more here:
    McCarthy Building Companies helps make Marin County healthier - Building Design + Construction (press release) (registration) (blog)

    Contractors: The trades badly need more skilled workers – Idaho Business Review - August 28, 2017 by admin

    Concrete workers at the site of the future St. Lukes Childrens Pavilion in Boise last spring. The Associated General Contractors of America plans to release recommendations for public officials August 29 on how to increase the pipeline of skilled workers. File photo

    The number of construction jobs in Idaho remained on an even keel in July, continuing a trend that started in March.

    About 43,000 to 44,000 people are building homes, commercial, office and industrial structures in the state, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

    AGCs monthly count had Idaho with 43,700 construction jobs in July, a 3.6 percent increase from the prior July. This ranked Idaho No. 20 among states.

    Idaho has been hovering around No. 20 since March after consistently ranking in the Top 5 in year-over year job growth with double-digit percentage job increases since 2015 until February. Several large construction projects have been winding down since then.

    Idaho did add 100 construction jobs from June to July, ranking No. 23, as construction started on the Boise State University Fine Arts Building. Construction is also imminent on an 86,000-square-foot office/retail building for Norco in Meridian.

    Idaho job numbers have stalled, in part, because of a shortage of qualified construction workers, said Jerry Frank, president and CEO at PETRA Inc., a Meridian-based general contractor.

    It is definitely an employees market right now, Frank said. It is really testing the loyalty of our team.

    A construction worker shortages is a national malaise. AGC on Aug. 29 will release regional and state construction worker shortage data and suggest steps public officials can take to increase the number of qualified workers.

    Neighboring states are faring better in finding construction workers.

    Oregon, Nevada, Utah and Washington exceeded Idahos construction job growth rate in July, as they have all year. Oregon and Nevada ranked No. 1 and No. 2 with 13.2 percent and 12.8 percent increases in July, according to AGC statistics.

    Go here to see the original:
    Contractors: The trades badly need more skilled workers - Idaho Business Review

    Downtown development boom seems endless, experts say – The Columbus Dispatch - August 10, 2017 by admin

    Jim Weiker The Columbus Dispatch @JimWeiker

    The Arena District-area development announced this week is the latest of several massive projects that could transform the Downtown skyline.

    If all are completed, several high-rises, including four towers more than 25 stories tall, would be built in Columbus, adding about 2,000 apartments and dozens of restaurants, shops and offices to the city's core.

    This Downtown boom, unlike the last one, in the 1970s and '80s, is driven by residential projects. But they come with a twist: All of the big proposed projects include other uses, such as offices, retail spaceand hotels.

    Despite some challenges filling empty office and retail space Downtown, experts believe the Columbus economy can support such a wave.

    Im bullish on these projects, said Mike Simpson, president of the commercial real-estate firm NAI Ohio Equities. The trend for being Downtown isnt just for residential.

    On Tuesday, the Schottenstein Real Estate Group became the mostrecentdeveloper to jump into the Downtown party when it unveiled plans for Grand Central, a 23-acre project near Huntington Park. It would include three buildings at least 10 stories tall for apartments, condominiums and a hotel.

    The project also would include a Main Street-style district of shops, restaurants, a grocery store and more apartments.

    "I think the market is here to stay and will be hot for the foreseeable future, especially in such a great location," said Brian Schottenstein, president of the development firm.

    Columbus Development Director Steve Schoeny said he's informally discussed the proposal with the developers. One big issue for the project will be access to the site, he said. The plan calls for several new roadsinto the development, includingones off Vine Street and Neil Avenue.

    In addition to Grand Central, other large Downtown proposals include:

    Millennial Tower, a 28-storybuilding with offices, stores, residences and a hotel at Rich and Front streets.

    Market Tower, a 35-story residential, retail and office tower next to the North Market.

    The development of 21 acres next to COSI in Franklinton that would include two 30-story residential towers as well as restaurants and shops, according to a city concept for the site.

    An office and residential park on land originally proposed for a casino on West Nationwide Boulevard.

    A mixed-use project on West Broad Street in Franklinton that would include offices, apartments, restaurants and entertainment.

    Several other projects are well underway or recently completed. They include:

    A 12-story residential and office building under construction at Downtown's John F. Wolfe Columbus Commons.

    A pair of 9- and 11-story apartment buildings going up at High and Rich streets.

    The renovation of the LeVeque Tower.

    The construction of two new 12-story Arena District condominium towers.

    Experts note that,though such buildings would transform the skyline, they would not actually add that many homes. Of the projects still in the proposal stage, the two towers furthest along, Millennial and Market, would include about 340 apartments. That's about half the number included in the complex recently announced for the former site of TheAndersons store on the Northwest Side.

    There's no indication that Downtown can't use more apartments. More than 98 percent of Downtown and Short North apartments are occupied and rents continue to rise, said Rob Vogt, managing partner of the residential research firm Vogt Strategic Insights.

    "I keep thinking were going to see some slowdown in absorption, but the projects that come online keep filling up," Vogt said. "We still have a long way to go before we exhaust the market. I feel pretty confident that even if we lose some of the millennial market, which is 60 or 70 percent of the demand, it will be back-filled by empty-nesters."

    Andthough about 10 percent of Downtown's offices are empty, those vacancies are concentrated in older buildings that have small footprints, small windows and a lack of parking. Newer office buildings, such as those around Columbus Commons and in the Arena District, quickly find an audience.

    "When you look at the vacancy in the Arena District or Grandview Yard new projects, with good floor plates(open floor plans)and good amenities those are doing very well," said Michael Copella, managing director of the Columbus office of the commercial real-estate firm CBRE.

    By many measures, Downtown retailersalso have struggled. As Schoeny noted, retail "is the lagging piece of the pie."

    Last year, 15 new stores and restaurants opened Downtown but eight closed, according tothe most recent "State of Downtown Columbus" report prepared by Capital Crossroads & Discovery Special Improvement Districts.

    But real-estate experts say the demand is for office, retail and residential space combined in one site, providing energy for all tenants and maximizing parking spaces.

    "That is the type of project that occupiers of office space are looking for today because it creates an experience for their employers," Copella said.

    jweiker@dispatch.com

    @JimWeiker

    View original post here:
    Downtown development boom seems endless, experts say - The Columbus Dispatch

    Mori Begins Construction on Indonesian Office Tower – Commercial Property Executive - August 10, 2017 by admin

    Mori Building began construction on its Class A office tower in Jakarta, Indonesia. The Project marks Mori Buildings first developmentin Southeast Asia.

    Shimizu Corp. and Bangun Cipta Kontraktor are jointly serving as the development contractors and Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates designed the tower. Kohn Perdersen Fox is also in charge with the design of aHong Kong mixed-use development.

    The Jakarta project is set to obtain a BCA Green Mark Platinum Award, which is one of the highest rating for environmental impact and performance. The tower is scheduledfor completion in 2021.

    The building is designed to be a new landmark in Jakarta, located in the center of the Golden Triangle,next to the Semanggi Intersection and the New Semanggi Flyover on Sudirman Street, the main thoroughfare in the citys central business district.The 59-story,two million-square-foot tower will feature offices, restaurants, cafes and a secure parking space for tenants of the building.

    Mori Building plans toleverage its extensive urban-development background from its diverse projects in Tokyo and Shanghai, to contribute to the advancement of Jakarta.

    Images courtesy of Mori Building

    See more here:
    Mori Begins Construction on Indonesian Office Tower - Commercial Property Executive

    « old entrysnew entrys »



    Page 3«..2345..1020..»